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Human genome at ten: The sequence explosion

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At the time of the announcement of the first drafts of the human genome in 2000, there were 8 billion base pairs of sequence in the three main databases for 'finished' sequence: GenBank, run by the US National Center for Biotechnology Information; the DNA Databank of Japan; and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Nucleotide Sequence Database. The databases share their data regularly as part of the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). In the subsequent first post-genome decade, they have added another 270 billion bases to the collection of finished sequence, doubling the size of the database roughly every 18 months. But this number is dwarfed by the amount of raw sequence that has been created and stored by researchers around the world in the Trace archive and Sequence Read Archive (SRA).

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Additional information

See Editorial, page 649 , and human genome special at http://www.nature.com/humangenome

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Related links in Nature Research

Human Genome at Ten

Personal Genomes Web Focus

Web Special: Big Data

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National Center for Biotechnology Information

EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database, EBI

DNA Databank of Japan

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Human genome at ten: The sequence explosion. Nature 464, 670–671 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1038/464670a

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