Solid-state physics

An insulator's metallic side

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Certain insulators have conducting surfaces that arise from subtle chemical properties of the bulk material. The latest experiments suggest that such surfaces may compete with graphene in electronic applications.

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Figure 1: Electron reflection, or not.

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Moore, J. An insulator's metallic side. Nature 460, 1090–1091 (2009) doi:10.1038/4601090b

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