Commentary | Published:

Time to turn off the lights

Nature volume 457, page 27 (01 January 2009) | Download Citation

Subjects

Cities needlessly shine billions of dollars directly into the sky each year and, as a result, a fifth of the world's population cannot see the Milky Way. Malcolm Smith explains why a dark sky has much to offer everyone.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Malcolm Smith is an astronomer at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena, Chile.  msmith@ctio.noao.edu

    • Malcolm Smith

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/457027a

See Editorial, page 7, and http://www.nature.com/astro09.

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