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Towards responsible use of cognitive-enhancing drugs by the healthy

Nature volume 456, pages 702705 (11 December 2008) | Download Citation

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  • A Correction to this article was published on 17 December 2008

Society must respond to the growing demand for cognitive enhancement. That response must start by rejecting the idea that 'enhancement' is a dirty word, argue Henry Greely and colleagues.

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Acknowledgements

This article is the result of a seminar held by the authors at Rockefeller University. Funds for the seminar were provided by Rockefeller University and Nature.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Henry Greely is at Stanford Law School, Crown Quadrangle, 559 Nathan Abbott Way, Stanford, California 94305-8610, USA.  hgreely@stanford.edu

    • Henry Greely
  2. Barbara Sahakian is at the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, and MRC/Wellcome Trust Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, Cambridge, UK.  jenny.hall@cpft.nhs.uk

    • Barbara Sahakian
  3. John Harris is at the Institute for Science, Ethics and Innovation, and Wellcome Strategic Programme in The Human Body, its Scope, Limits and Future, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK.  john.harris@manchester.ac.uk

    • John Harris
  4. Ronald C. Kessler is at Harvard Medical School, Department of Health Care Policy, 180 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115-5899, USA.  kessler@hcp.med.harvard.edu

    • Ronald C. Kessler
  5. Michael Gazzaniga is at the Sage Center for the Study of Mind, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9660, USA.  m.gazzaniga@psych.ucsb.edu

    • Michael Gazzaniga
  6. Philip Campbell is at Nature, 4 Crinan St, London N1 9XW, UK.  nature@nature.com

    • Philip Campbell
  7. Martha J. Farah is at the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Pennsylvania, 3720 Walnut Street, Room B51, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-6241, USA.  mfarah@psych.upenn.edu

    • Martha J. Farah

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Competing interests

B.S. consults for a number of pharmaceutical companies and Cambridge Cognition, and holds shares in CeNeS. R.C.K. consults for and has received grants from a number of pharmaceutical companies.

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