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China

The prizes and pitfalls of progress

Pushes to globalize science must not threaten local innovations in developing countries, argues Lan Xue.

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References

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See Editorial, page 367 , and News Feature, page 382 . For a podcast and more China see http://www.nature.com/news/specials/china/ . To discuss this and other commentaries in the Innovation series visit: http://tinyurl.com/5uolx2 .

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Xue, L. The prizes and pitfalls of progress. Nature 454, 398–401 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1038/454398a

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