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Planetary science

Isotopic lunacy

Nature volume 450, pages 356357 (15 November 2007) | Download Citation

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The Moon could have been derived from a well-mixed disk of rock vapour that was produced after the early Earth collided with another planet. This persuasive idea offers a fresh perspective on the history of both bodies.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Alex N. Halliday is in the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division, University of Oxford, 9 Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PD, UK. alex.halliday@mpls.ox.ac.uk

    • Alex N. Halliday

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/450356a

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