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Evolutionary biology

Essence of mitochondria

For years, a unicellular creature called Giardia has occupied a special place in biology because it was thought to lack mitochondria. But it does have them — though tiny, they pack a surprising anaerobic punch.

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Figure 1: Mitochondria where least expected.

HOSSLER, CUSTOM MED. STOCK PHOTO/SPL

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Correspondence to Katrin Henze or William Martin.

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Henze, K., Martin, W. Essence of mitochondria. Nature 426, 127–128 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1038/426127a

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