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Conservation biology

Parasites lost

Nature volume 421, pages 585586 (06 February 2003) | Download Citation

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Why do some plants and animals become pests when they are introduced to new areas? Part of the answer seems to be that they have left most of their parasites behind, gaining vigour as a consequence.

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Correspondence to Keith Clay.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/421585a

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