Letter | Published:

A eukaryotic transcriptional represser with carboxypeptidase activity

Nature volume 378, pages 9296 (02 November 1995) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

ADIPOCYTE differentiation involves the transcriptional activation of several genes in triglyceride metabolism, including the adipose P2 (aP2 or 422) gene that encodes the adipocyte lipid-binding protein ALBP1–3. Within the mouse aP2 promoter region, the AE-1 sequence functions as either a positive or a negative element in the regulation of aP2 gene expression4–8. The AE-1 sequence is the binding site for the positive murine (3T3) adipocyte factor C/ EBP-α5,6, several human preadipocyte factors7, and a 3T3 pre-adipocyte factor(s) that has been implicated as a repressor of aP2 gene expression4,5,7,8. Here we report the cloning of new complementary DNAs that encode the 3T3 preadipocyte factor (termed AEBP1), and demonstrate that AEBP1 expression is abolished during adipocyte differentiation. Furthermore, we show that an activity of a carboxypeptidase associated with AEBP1 is important in the transcriptional repression function of AEBP1. Thus AEBP1 might represent a new type of transcription factor that regulates transcription by cleavage of factors involved in transcription.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    , & J. biol. Chem. 258, 10083–10089 (1983).

  2. 2.

    , , , & Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 81, 5468–5472 (1984).

  3. 3.

    , , & J. biol. Chem. 259, 15548–15555 (1984).

  4. 4.

    , , , & Cell 49, 835–844 (1987).

  5. 5.

    , , , & Molec. cell. Biol. 9, 5331–5339 (1989).

  6. 6.

    et al. Genes Dev. 3, 1323–1335 (1989).

  7. 7.

    & Molec. cell. Biol. 11, 2303–2306 (1991).

  8. 8.

    , , , & Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 3629–3633 (1989).

  9. 9.

    & Cell 50, 137–142 (1987).

  10. 10.

    , , & Cell 67, 377–388 (1991).

  11. 11.

    , , , & Science 241, 350–353 (1988).

  12. 12.

    , , , & Nature 340, 653–656 (1989).

  13. 13.

    et al. Cell 62, 1189–1204 (1990).

  14. 14.

    et al. Cell 62, 1217–1226 (1990).

  15. 15.

    et al. Cell 62, 1205–1215 (1990).

  16. 16.

    Trends Genet. 6, 192–197 (1990).

  17. 17.

    et al. Nature 346, 387–390 (1990).

  18. 18.

    , , & J. molec. Biol. 153, 273–289 (1981).

  19. 19.

    et al. Neuron 7, 295–307 (1991).

  20. 20.

    , & Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 5677–5681 (1993).

  21. 21.

    et al. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87, 8417–8421 (1990).

  22. 22.

    & Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 6800–6804 (1986).

  23. 23.

    et al. Nature 312, 330–337 (1984).

  24. 24.

    et al. Biochem. J. 267, 517–525 (1990).

  25. 25.

    , & Eur. J. Biochem. 178, 603–607 (1989).

  26. 26.

    , , , & J. biol. Chem. 264, 13165–13170 (1989).

  27. 27.

    et al. Cell 52, 415–423 (1988).

  28. 28.

    et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 22, 646–655 (1994).

  29. 29.

    et al. J. biol. Chem. 235, 2272–2277 (1960).

Download references

Author information

Author notes

    • Hyo-Sung Ro

    To whom correspondence should be addressed.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 4H7, Canada

    • Gong-Ping He
    • , Aleixo Muise
    • , Audrey Wu Li
    •  & Hyo-Sung Ro

Authors

  1. Search for Gong-Ping He in:

  2. Search for Aleixo Muise in:

  3. Search for Audrey Wu Li in:

  4. Search for Hyo-Sung Ro in:

About this article

Publication history

Received

Accepted

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/378092a0

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.