Herpes simplex virus turns off the TAP to evade host immunity

Article metrics

Abstract

MANY viruses have evolved mechanisms to avoid detection by the host immune system. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) expresses an immediate early protein, ICP47, which blocks presentation of viral peptides to MHC class I-restricted cells1. The properties of the newly synthesized class I molecules in HSV-infected cells resemble those of cell lines deficient in the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) in that class I molecules are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum1,2, and the heavy chain and β2-microglobulin subunits dissociate in detergent extracts but the complex can be stabilized by peptides1. We show here that ICP47 binds to TAP and prevents peptide translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1

    York, I. A. et al. Cell 77, 525–535 (1994).

  2. 2

    Hill, A. B., Barnett, B., McMichael, A. J. & McGeoch, D. J. Immun. 152, 2736 (1994).

  3. 3

    Townsend, A. et al. Nature 340, 443–446 (1989).

  4. 4

    Ljunggren, H. G. et al. Nature 346, 476–480 (1990).

  5. 5

    Heemels, M.-T. & Ploegh, H. L. A. Rev. Biochem. 64, 463–491 (1995).

  6. 6

    Yewdell, J. W. & Bennink, J. R. Adv. Immun. 52, 1–123 (1992).

  7. 7

    Heemels, M.-T., Schumacher, T. N. M., Wonigeit, K. & Ploegh, H. L. Science 262, 2059–2063 (1993).

  8. 8

    Schumacher, T. N. M., Kantesaria, D. V., Serreze, D. V., Roopenian, D. C. & Ploegh, H. L. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91, 13004–13008 (1994).

  9. 9

    Neefjes, J. J., Momburg, F. & Hämmerling, G. J. Science 261, 769–771 (1993).

  10. 10

    Higgins, C. F. A. Rev. Cell Biol. 8, 67–113 (1992).

  11. 11

    Shepherd, J. C. et al. Cell 74, 577–584 (1993).

  12. 12

    van Endert, P. M. et al. Immunity 1, 491–500 (1994).

  13. 13

    Androlewicz, M. J., Anderson, K. A. & Cresswell, P. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 9130–9134 (1993).

  14. 14

    de la Salle, H. et al. Science 265, 237–241 (1994).

  15. 15

    Mavromara-Nazas, P., Ackermann, M. & Roizman, B. J. Viriol. 60, 807–812 (1986).

  16. 16

    Roesle, J., Gromme, M., Momburg, F., Hämmerling, G. & Neefjes, J. J. exp. Med. 180, 1591–1597 (1994).

  17. 17

    Heemels, M.-T. & Ploegh, H. L. Immunity 1, 775–784 (1994).

  18. 18

    Ortmann, B., Androlewicz, M. J. & Cresswell, P. Nature 368, 864–867 (1994).

  19. 19

    Suh, W.-K. et al. Science 264, 1322–1326 (1994).

  20. 20

    Androlewicz, M. J., Ortmann, B., van Endert, P. M., Spies, T. & Cresswell, P. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91, 12716–12720 (1994).

  21. 21

    Beersma, M. F. C., Bijlmakers, M. J. E. & Ploegh, H. J. Immun. 151, 4455–4464 (1993).

  22. 22

    Schägger, H. & vonJagow, G. Analyt. Biochem. 166, 368–379 (1987).

  23. 23

    Cromme, F. V. et al. J. exp. Med. 170, 335–340 (1994).

  24. 24

    Stam, N. J., Spits, H. & Ploegh, H. L. J. Immun. 137, 2299 (1986).

  25. 25

    Neefjes, J. J., Breur-Vriewendorp, B. S., van Seventer, G. A., Ivanyi, P. & Ploegh, H. L. Hum. Immunol. 16, 169 (1986).

  26. 26

    Colonna, M., Bresnahan, M., Bahram, S., Strominger, J. L. & Spies, T. Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 89, 3932–3936 (1992).

  27. 27

    Chakrabarti, S., Brechling, K. & Moss, B. Molec. cell. Biol. 5, 3403–3409 (1985).

  28. 28

    Cox, J. H., Yewdell, J. W., Eisenlohr, L. C., Johnson, P. R. & Bennink, J. R. Science 247, 715–718 (1990).

  29. 29

    Coupar, B. E., Andrew, M. E. & Boyle, D. B. Gene 68, 1–10 (1988).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.