Letter | Published:

Dispersion of neural progenitors within the germinal zones of the forebrain

Nature volume 362, pages 636638 (15 April 1993) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

ONE of the early events in the establishment of regional diversity in brain is the subdivision of the forebrain into the cerebral cortex1–7 and underlying basal ganglia8. This subdivision is of special interest, owing to the striking difference in cellular patterning in these two regions. Whereas the dorsal aspect of the telencephalon gives rise to the laminar, cortical regions of brain, the basal aspect gives rise to nuclear, subcortical regions. To examine early events in the regionalization of the forebrain, we visualized cell movement within the ventricular zones of the dorsal and basal regions of the E15 murine telencephalon. Over an 8–24-hour observation period, labelled cells moved extensively in the plane of the cortical ventricular zone. Cell dispersion was restricted, however, at the border between the cortical ventricular zone and the lateral ganglionic eminence, the basal telencephalic ventricular zone. We suggest that this restriction of cell movements establishes a regional pattern of neurogenesis in the developing brain.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    Histologie du Systeme Neneux de I'Homme et des Vertebres Vol. II (Maloine, Paris, 1911).

  2. 2.

    J. comp. Neurol. 63, 13–23 (1935).

  3. 3.

    & Proc. Soc. exp. Biot. Med. 101, 557–560 (1959).

  4. 4.

    J. comp. Neurol. 141, 283–312 (1971).

  5. 5.

    & Brain Res. 62, 1–35 (1973).

  6. 6.

    & J. Anat. 99, 691–709 (1965).

  7. 7.

    The Boulder Committee Anat Rec. 166, 257–262 (1970).

  8. 8.

    & Ontogeny of the Neostriatum 23, 127–146 (1979).

  9. 9.

    & Trends Neurosci. 12, 333–341 (1989).

  10. 10.

    & J. Neurosci. 58, 815–821 (1988).

  11. 11.

    , & Glia 4, 138–148 (1991).

  12. 12.

    & J. Neurosci. 7, 1928–1934 (1987).

  13. 13.

    , & Neuron 5, 173–186 (1990).

  14. 14.

    & Blood Cells 10, 61–77 (1984).

  15. 15.

    & Soc. Neurosci. Abstr. 18, 925 (1992).

  16. 16.

    , & Neuron 1, 635–647 (1988).

  17. 17.

    & Development 104, 473–482 (1988).

  18. 18.

    & Science 241, 1342–1345 (1988).

  19. 19.

    & Science 255, 434–440 (1992).

  20. 20.

    , , , & Cerebral Cortex 1, 221–234 (1991).

  21. 21.

    & Neuron 6, 211–225 (1992).

  22. 22.

    , , & Science 258, 299–302 (1992).

  23. 23.

    , , & Neuron 7, 221–229 (1991).

  24. 24.

    & Neuron 8, 957–966 (1992).

  25. 25.

    , , , & Nature 351, 748–751 (1991).

  26. 26.

    et al. Genes Dev. 5, 1524–1537 (1991).

  27. 27.

    et al. Nature 358, 687–690 (1992).

  28. 28.

    , & Nature 344, 431–435 (1990).

  29. 29.

    & Cell 68, 283–302 (1992).

Download references

Author information

Author notes

    • Gord Fishell
    •  & Mary E. Hatten

    Present address: The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, New York 10021-6399, USA

Affiliations

  1. Department of Pathology, Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032, USA

    • Gord Fishell
    • , Carol A. Mason
    •  & Mary E. Hatten

Authors

  1. Search for Gord Fishell in:

  2. Search for Carol A. Mason in:

  3. Search for Mary E. Hatten in:

About this article

Publication history

Received

Accepted

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/362636a0

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.