A gene from the region of the human X inactivation centre is expressed exclusively from the inactive X chromosome

Abstract

X-chromosome inactivation results in the cis-limited dosage compensation of genes on one of the pair of X chromosomes in mammalian females. Although most X-linked genes are believed to be subject to inactivation, several are known to be expressed from both active and inactive X chromosomes. Here we describe an X-linked gene with a novel expression pattern—transcripts are detected only from the inactive X chromosome (Xi) and not from the active X chromosome (Xa). This gene, called XIST (for Xi-specific transcripts), is a candidate for a gene either involved in or uniquely influenced by the process of X inactivation.

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Brown, C., Ballabio, A., Rupert, J. et al. A gene from the region of the human X inactivation centre is expressed exclusively from the inactive X chromosome. Nature 349, 38–44 (1991). https://doi.org/10.1038/349038a0

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