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The origin of ozone in the troposphere

Nature volume 274, pages 855858 (31 August 1978) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Examination of the distribution of tropospheric ozone indicates that surface destruction in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) should be about three times larger than in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). If, according to the traditional understanding of ozone, this species were a passive tracer in the troposphere, a threefold larger flux out of the stratosphere should exist in the NH than in the SH. However, meteorological analyses fail to support such pronounced hemispheric differences in stratosphere–troposphere exchange. Alternatively, therefore, we hypothesise that photochemical synthesis of ozone in the troposphere may be particularly important in the NH because of asymmetries in the sources and distribution of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and nitric oxide.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Ft Collins, Colorado 80523

    • Jack Fishman
  2. National Center for Atmospheric Research, PO Box 3000, Boulder, Colorado 80307

    • Paul J. Crutzen

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https://doi.org/10.1038/274855a0

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