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Induction of specific antibodies to poly(ADP–ribose) in rabbits by double-stranded RNA, poly(A)·poly(U)

Nature volume 274, pages 809812 (24 August 1978) | Download Citation

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Abstract

WE have reported1 the presence of naturally occurring antibodies to poly(ADP–ribose) in the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). During our study we discovered a population of antibodies cross-reacting with poly(A)·poly(U) among the antibodies to poly(ADP–ribose) and found that this population could be completely removed by absorption of the SLE sera with poly(A)·poly(U)1. The mechanism of the cross-reaction to poly(A)·poly(U) of some antibodies to poly(ADP–ribose) is unknown. Poly(ADP–ribose) is a biopolymer which is synthesised by nuclear enzyme(s)2. Recent advance in the study of this biopolymer has been reviewed3,4. We have found5 that poly(ADP–ribose) shows strong antigenicity in rabbits and that rabbit antibodies to poly(ADP–ribose) do not cross-react at all with synthetic homopolynucleotides. However, the cross-reactions of rabbit antibodies with double-stranded RNA, poly(A)·poly(U) or poly(I)·poly(C), have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, we tested whether poly(A)·poly(U) can induce specific antibodies to poly(ADP–ribose) and, conversely, whether poly(ADP–ribose) can induce antibodies cross-reacting with poly(A)·poly(U). We describe here that induction of specific antibodies to poly(ADP–ribose) in rabbits could be achieved by injecting a complex of poly(A)·poly(U) and methylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA) in Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA); moreover, poly(A)·poly(U) has a specific effect in inducing antibodies to poly(ADP–ribose), as neither poly(I)·poly(C) nor poly(A) induce antibodies to poly(ADP–ribose).

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108, Japan

    • YOSHIYUKI KANAI
    •  & TAIJIRO MATSUSHIMA
  2. Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104

    • TAKASHI SUGIMURA

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https://doi.org/10.1038/274809a0

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