The Psychotomimetic Properties of 3,4,5-Trimethoxyamphetamine

Abstract

dl-3,4,5-TRIMETHOXYAMPHETAMINE (dl-TMA), first prepared as a homologue of mescaline in 1947 1, has remained to a large measure unexplored. A single paper has described its effects in human subjects2, demonstrating that the drug allows stroboscope-induced hallucinations at the levels employed, namely, 0.8–2.0 mgm./kgm., orally. In the present work, dl-3,4,5-trimethoxyamphetamine was synthesized by the general method of Ramirez and Burger3 and was chemically identical to that previously described1. Pharmacological similarity was demonstrated by the administration of between 1.6 and 2.0 mgm./kgm. as the hydrochloride, to three adult male subjects. The responses were found to be parallel in intensity and duration to those described earlier2, although the vivid hallucinations reported were not observed.

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References

  1. 1

    Hey, P., Quart. J. Pharm. Pharmacol., 20, 129 (1947).

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  2. 2

    Peretz, D. I., Smythies, J. R., and Gibson, W. C., J. Mental Sci., 101, 317 (1955).

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    Ramirez, F. A., and Burger, A., J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 72, 2782 (1950).

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SHULGIN, A., BUNNELL, S. & SARGENT, T. The Psychotomimetic Properties of 3,4,5-Trimethoxyamphetamine. Nature 189, 1011–1012 (1961). https://doi.org/10.1038/1891011a0

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