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Autografting In Children

Rapid immune reconstitution following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children: a single institution experience

Summary:

In this retrospective study, we review the immune reconstitution of children undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A total of 125 patients underwent autologous transplantation between 1992 and 2000. The report includes data on 58 patients. Data were not available on the remaining patients who either died before testing or data were not obtained. The parameters evaluated include: (a) immunophenotype by flow cytometry to quantify lymphocyte subpopulations (b) mitogen stimulation assays, and (c) quantitative immunoglobulins. The analysis reveals that CD3+ cells did not reach the normal range during the first year post-transplant. The median percentage of CD4+ cells was below normal up to 6 months post-transplant, while the absolute number remain low throughout the first year. The CD8+ percentage and absolute numbers remain normal at all times post-transplant. The CD19+ cells were also normal post-transplantation. The mitogen lymphocyte stimulation was normal in 27 out of 31 patients tested after 6 months post-transplant. Our analysis of immune reconstitution shows a similar pattern to previous studies with a faster recovery of the CD4/CD8 ratio, especially in those patients who did not receive TBI. In conclusion, the observed deficiencies are transient and have very little clinical significance because, historically, the rate of serious infections is low despite prolonged immune suppression. The recovery postautologous transplant is fast.

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Hoepfner, S., Haut, P., O'Gorman, M. et al. Rapid immune reconstitution following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children: a single institution experience. Bone Marrow Transplant 31, 285–290 (2003). https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1703831

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bmt.1703831

Keywords

  • autologous
  • stem cell transplantation
  • immune reconstitution

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