Conversion of Nitrites into Oximes in Silkworms and its Relation to the Experimental Production of Virus Disease

Abstract

FIVE years ago we found1 that hydroxylamine causes the formation of virus protein in the body of the silkworm without virus infection. As it has been established, particularly by Virtanen2, that hydroxylamine and oxaloacetic acid oxime appear as intermediate products of nitrogen fixation by bacteria, I assumed that these compounds must be widely distributed in animals and plants and often act as general agents which provoke the outbreak of virus diseases. In recent experiments we have shown3 that various animal and plant tissues contain oximes and the oxime-content changes with the growth. In this communication I propose to describe briefly the results of experiments in which silkworms were fed with nitrites.

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References

  1. 1

    Yamafuji, K., and Shirozu, Y., Biochem. Z., 317, 94 (1944). Yamafuji, K., and Cho, T., ibid., 318, 915 (1947).

  2. 2

    Virtanen, A. I., and Laine, B., Biochem. J., 33, 412 (1939).

  3. 3

    Yamafuji, K., Kondo, H., and Omura, H. (unpublished).

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YAMAFUJI, K. Conversion of Nitrites into Oximes in Silkworms and its Relation to the Experimental Production of Virus Disease. Nature 165, 651–652 (1950) doi:10.1038/165651a0

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