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Botany in Nigeria : Prof. F. W. Sansome

Nature volume 162, page 327 (28 August 1948) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE new University College in Nigeria is fortunate to have secured Dr. F. W. Sansome as its first professor of botany. Dr. Sansome received his undergraduate training in Edinburgh as an agriculturist. Upon this foundation he added, at first in Glasgow and later at the John Innes Horticultural Institution, a thorough training in botany and genetics. At this time Dr. Sansome carried out important work on tetraploidy in tomatoes, and published (with Dr. Philp) "Recent Advances in Plant Genetics", which rapidly ran through two editions. He then became senior lecturer in the Botany Department in the University of Manchester, and assistant director of the Experimental Grounds, with responsibilities in horticultural botany and genetics. He devoted his energy, with great success, to the building up of facilities for horticultural research, and the Jodrell Bank Station owes its efficiency to Dr. Sansome‘s work. Dr. Sansome‘s infectious enthusiasm has endeared him to horticulturists and students in the north of England, and his wisdom and wit and generosity are greatly appreciated by his colleagues. The good wishes of professional botanists and a large general public will accompany him on his new venture. It is a pleasure to know that his wife, who is distinguished for her research on cytology, is to be a research fellow in Ibadan, and will continue her work there.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/162327b0

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