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Medical Education

Nature volume 162, pages 311314 (28 August 1948) | Download Citation

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Abstract

MEDICAL education continues to be the subject of very lively discussion. In 1944 the Goodenough Committee issued its much-quoted report on the “Organisation of Medical Schools”1. A year ago an authoritative sequel appeared in the form of the General Medical Council‘s “Recommendations as to the Medical Curriculum”2. Newer and detailed proposals have now been published under the title “The Training of a Doctor” under the authorship of a Curriculum Committee that was set up in 1945 by the British Medical Association3. In the background, reaching far back over the years, are many other reports on the same subject. Before considering where the British Medical Association‘s proposals stand in relation to those of the Goodenough Committee and the General Medical Council, it is useful to consider for a moment why the medical curriculum is always under fire. For so it would seem to be if one compares medical with other university departments ; there has certainly been no corresponding wealth of reports about the teaching of chemistry, physics or electrical engineering.

References

  1. 1.

    Report of the Interdepartmental Committee on Medical Schools. (H.M. Stationery Office, 1944.) (Reviewed in Nature, 154, 322; 1944.)

  2. 2.

    Recommendations as to the Medical Curriculum. General Medical Council, April 1947. (Reviewed in Nature, 160, 481; 1947.)

  3. 3.

    The Training of a Doctor. Report of the Medical Curriculum Committee of the British Medical Association. (London, Butterworth and Co., Ltd., 1948.) 7s. 6d. net.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/162311a0

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