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The Venereal Diseases

Nature volume 162, page 86 (17 July 1948) | Download Citation

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Abstract

OF making many books there is no end, but this is not true of text-books on venereal diseases published in Great Britain ; for this reason Dr. Marshall‘s manual is particularly welcome, more especially as it is full of sound teaching which should be valuable both to the student and to the practitioner. Venereal diseases have been with us since time immemorial, nor have they changed very much ; but their treatment is constantly changing, and this has been most marked since the introduction of the sulphonamides and penicillin. No doubt this was largely the reason for the production of a second edition so soon after the first. This second edition contains a number of minor changes and improvements, but is of chief importance in that it brings the therapeutic use of penicillin up to date and at the same time introduces new matter on intensive and semi-intensive arsenotherapy, non-gonococcal urethritis, which was so prevalent in most armies during the War, and Reiter‘s syndrome, which, if it is not venereal in origin, certainly brings many patients to venereal diseases clinics. Those who are not familiar with this condition will do well to read What Dr. Marshall has to say about it, because no doubt it is one which has been frequently missed in the past and is probably commoner than many suppose ; moreover, treatment is far from satisfactory, and patients are often rendered incapable of work for many weeks by the painful arthritis which is one of the prominent features.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/162086a0

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  1. Search for T. E. OSMOND in:

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