News | Published:

Exhibition of Applied Photography

Nature volume 159, pages 633634 (10 May 1947) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

AN Exhibition of Applied Photography arranged by Kodak Ltd. at Australia House, Strand, London, was opened on May 6 by Prof. E. 1ST. da C. Andrade. The exhibits illustrate a very wide range of industrial and commercial applications of photography, the applications being illustrated by photographs, diagrams and in some cases demonstrations. Photography received a fair amount of publicity during the War, particularly on account of its obvious importance for air reconnaissance. There were, however, many other applications less spectacular, but nevertheless of great value, many of which are illustrated in some form in this exhibition. Most of these applications have come to stay and will play a useful part in peace-time industry. The range covered by the exhibition is very wide ; on the spectacular side is a full-sized radiograph of a 'Jeep' to set against the purely utilitarian micro-copying of documents. Other exhibits include industrial radiography, gamma radiography, stereoscopy, photography in education, colour reproduction and the reproduction of drawings on metal. Among the most interesting exhibits are the 16-mm. projectors showing continuously running films of mechanical and manual operations, some in slow motion, to illustrate how an analysis of the motion can be used to speed up, or reduce fatigue in, the operation. Most of the exhibits illustrate industrial applications of photography, and the whole provides an interesting collection well worth a visit. The exhibition remains open until May 16.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/159633c0

Authors

    Comments

    By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

    Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing