MAN-POWER IN GREAT BRITAIN

    Abstract

    2. SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, TECHNICAL TRAINING AND THE UNIVERSITIES:

    THE debate on Defence Policy in the House of Commons on March 4 and 5, while focused on the Statement Relating to Defence (Cmd. 6743. London: H.M.S.O. February 1945. 2d. net), was essentially a continuation of that during the previous week on economic affairs in relation to man-power. Both were equally concerned with the means of answering the Prime Minister's call for increased efficiency in production and for a higher output. But whereas the first debate was concerned essentially with the means for securing the maximum output and the most efficient use of industrial man-power in Britain once it is distributed, the second debate was concerned with the more fundamental question of the right distribution of available man-power between the Armed Forces themselves, the industries which supply these forces with equipment and weapons, the Government and other public services and the industries which supply the needs of the civil population and the export trades.

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    MAN-POWER IN GREAT BRITAIN. Nature 157, 457–460 (1946) doi:10.1038/157457a0

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