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The International Setting of Reconstruction

Nature volume 155, pages 7374 (20 January 1945) | Download Citation

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Abstract

UNDER the general title "Looking Forward", the Royal Institute of International Affairs is publishing a series of pamphlets on the international aspects of reconstruction, which are intended to stimulate thought and discussion, and to aim at presenting problems rather than to solve them. In the first of these, "Britain and the World" (Pp. 60. 1s. net), the Hon. H. A. Wyndham gives an outline of reconstruction problems; the general background in Europe and the Middle East, and such factors as freedom of trade and migration in the nineteenth century and up to 1939 are discussed in the first part, and Britain's position in the post-war world is considered in the second part. Some home problems, such as industry and its organization and control, demobilization, exports, social insurance, housing and agriculture, health and educational services are briefly indicated in the third. The second chapter indicates some of the implications of the Atlantic Charter in such matters as relief and rehabilitation in Europe and the Middle East, the significance of the Hot Springs Conference, the potentialities of the Middle East Supply Centre, the problem of Germany and the special problems of the British Empire, such as the co-ordination of foreign policy and defence and trends in colonial welfare and development. Although necessarily sketchy, the pamphlet succeeds in indicating the relation of particular problems to the larger issues, and the problems of home and international policy, on the solution of which Britain's economic stability, social security and future prosperity depend.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/155073c0

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