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Nature volume 154, pages 614615 (11 November 1944) | Download Citation

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Irish Fisheries CONTINUING his researches on Irish freshwater fisheries Arthur E. J. Went has published a further study of the sea trout of the Waterville (Currane) River (Sci. Proc. Roy. Dublin Soc., 23 (N.S.), No. 20; 1944), following the work of Went and Barker (1943). It was found in the latter report that the calculated smolt-length of the spring-running sea trout was exceedingly high and the question arose as to whether the later-running smolts had similar high mean lengths, and if so whether these were taken inadvertently by anglers before their descent to the sea in the belief that they were small adult sea trout. It is found by examining new material that the spring-running fish are merely part of the general stocks of sea trout in the Waterville River system and not different from the late-running fish. The rapid growth in fresh water and the large size attained by the smolts are, more or less, unique so far as sea trout have been investigated to date. A second paper by A. E. J. Went (Proc. Irish Acad., 49, C, No. 5; May 1944) gives an account of the modes of fishing in the Galway Fishery. In 1942 Mr. Went gave a detailed review of the ownership of the fishery in the same publication (48, C, No. 5). In the present work the various fishery methods are described, the sites of the fishing engines and certain other data, in order to make it more or less complete.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/154614a0

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