Obituary | Published:

The Right Hon. Lord Glanely

Nature volume 150, page 86 (18 July 1942) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THE RIGHT HON. LORD GLANELY, whose death occurred on June 28 as a result of enemy action, was president of the Court of Governors of the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire. A Cardiff shipping magnate and head of the Tatem Shipping Company, he had always maintained a special interest in University College, Cardiff. After the War of 1914-18, when a special appeal was launched for the completion of the buildings on the new site in Cathays Park, he made a magnificent donation of £100,000 to that fund. This was allocated to the provision of the “Tatem Chemical Laboratory” and to the erection of a wing of the College to be devoted to the study of agriculture, a subject in which the late Lord Glanely was specially interested. This wing now houses the Advisory Departments of Agricultural Zoology, Agricultural Botany and Veterinary Science. In 1930 Lord Glanely made a gift of £2,000 to found two scholarships in memory of his wife, to be awarded in the first place to the children of parents who are or have been employed at or about Cardiff Docks. In this way he indicated his special interest in the welfare of the workers in the industry from which he derived his fortune. At the time of his death Lord Glanely was serving his third five-year term of office as president of University College, Cardiff. The College mourns the loss of a generous benefactor whose sympathy for, and interest in, its progress had extended over twenty-five years, the most difficult and important in its history.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/150086a0

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