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Prof. J. H. Gaddum

Nature volume 140, page 717 (23 October 1937) | Download Citation

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PROF. J. H. GADDUM, professor of pharmacology at University College, London, has been appointed to the University chair of pharmacology tenable at the College of the Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain and has also been appointed director of the Society's Pharmacological Laboratories. Prof. Gaddum was educated at Rugby and at Trinity College, Cambridge, and afterwards he studied medicine at University College Hospital in 1922-24. From that time onwards he has been in the forefront as an investigator of problems of biological standardization. In 1924 he was appointed to the Wellcome Physiological Research Laboratories and in 1927 became assistant to Sir Henry Dale at the National Institute for Medical Research. From January 1934 he was professor of pharmacology in Cairo, and in the summer of 1935 was appointed to the professorship of pharmacology at University College which he has just relinquished. Prof. Gaddum was a member of the sub-committees on the biological standards for digitalis, strophanthus and ergot for the British Pharmacopoeia, 1932: he also served on the subcommittee dealing with the accuracy of biological assays for the 1936 Addendum to the Pharmacopoeia. His published work includes contributions on the estimation of strophanthus, thyroid preparations and on the determination of the toxicity of neoarsphen-amine. His other work has been connected with the detection and isolation of substances occurring naturally in the body, such as the estimation of histamine in blood. He is secretary of the Physiological Society.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/140717c0

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