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Evans' Biological Institute

Nature volume 140, page 676 (16 October 1937) | Download Citation

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Abstract

A COMPANY of some seventy-five medical men attended the Evans' Biological Institute at Runcorn, Cheshire, on October 7, when an extension was formally opened by Lord Derby. In introducing Lord Derby to the company, Mr. T. Edward Lescher directed attention to the fact that the organization known as Evans' Biological Institute is the result of continuous development during the last twenty-five years, and that it originated as a laboratory and farm station in connexion with the Liverpool Institute of Comparative Pathology under the aegis of the University of Liverpool. It was in 1903 that Prof, (afterwards Sir Rupert) Boyce, professor of pathology, and Prof, (now Sir Charles) Sherrington, professor of physiology, together with Dr. H. E. Annett, then lecturer on comparative pathology, conceived the idea of establishing a farm station at Higher Runcorn for the study of comparative pathology. Included in the committee of management was Mr. J. J. Evans, the first chairman of Evans Sons Lescher and Webb, Ltd., and his son Mr. J. H. E. Evans, who is the present chairman of the company. Shortly before the Great War, the University was compelled to relinquish activities at Runcorn, and the laboratories and farm station and laboratory personnel were taken over by the above firm. Although to some extent the activities were restricted during the War and for some years afterwards, valuable work was done and much experience gained. Gradually the scope of the work carried on was extended and accommodation increased, and in 1928 a commodious new building, containing up-to-date laboratories and equipment, was erected. Additional stables were erected in due course, and this year another new building has been completed.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/140676b0

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