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The Structure of the Alps

Abstract

IN a review of the first edition of Prof. Collet's fascinating account of the building of the Alps (NATURE, 121, 412; 1928), the appeal of his work to mountaineers and holiday-seekers, as well as geologists, was emphasised. That the book should have gone out of print and a revised edition be required is a tribute to its value and interest; also to the rapid progress of Alpine studies. Indeed, as the author states in his preface to this second edition, “a brilliant international gathering of geologists has been engaged in following the Alpine structure in the Western, as well as in the Eastern, Mediterranean regions, and new ideas of the structure of the Alpine Range have been presented”. Prof. Collet has therefore added a new Part 6, consisting of six short chapters dealing with the Apennines, the mountain-arcs of Corsica, Sardinia and Elba, the Alpine Chain of southern Spain and the Balearic Islands. As many of these areas are becoming increasingly popular as tourist resorts (and for residence), Prof. Collet's descriptions of the rock-structures and their effects on the scenery will be highly appreciated.

The Structure of the Alps

By Prof. Leon W. Collet. Second edition. Pp. xvi + 304 + 12 plates. (London: Edward Arnold and Co., 1935.) 20s. net.

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B., P. The Structure of the Alps. Nature 138, 8 (1936). https://doi.org/10.1038/138008a0

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