Late Tudor and Early Stuart Geography, 1583–1650: a Sequel to Tudor Geography, 1485–1583

    Abstract

    IN her previous volume, Dr. Taylor set out the background of geographical thought and nautical theory between 1485 and 1583. The present volume deals with a period in which the chief note is transition. The Hakluyts, more farseeing than most men of their age, thought of the new lands across the seas, not as sources of immediate wealth for spoliation, but as possible colonies which by the slower process of plantation and settlement might become more truly valuable. Ideas of control and planning appear in studies of economic geography, and gratitude is due to the author for the insertion of Plate VII, which shows contemporary cartoons dealing with those still vital questions, the beginning of capitalism and the traffic problem.

    Late Tudor and Early Stuart Geography, 1583–1650: a Sequel to Tudor Geography, 1485–1583.

    By Prof. E. G. R. Taylor. Pp. xi + 322 + 8 plates. (London: Methuen and Co., Ltd., 1934.) 15s. net.

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    Late Tudor and Early Stuart Geography, 1583–1650: a Sequel to Tudor Geography, 1485–1583 . Nature 134, 125 (1934). https://doi.org/10.1038/134125b0

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