(1) The Anthropology of the Greeks (2) The Mechanistic Principle and the Non-mechanical (3) Transformisme et Créationisme (4) A History of Education in Modern Times (5) Methodik und Technik des naturgeschichtlichen Unterrichts

Abstract

(1) HERE is always an interest, and often no little instruction, to be derived from a study of the science and religion of ancient civilisations, especially when considered in their inter-relations. One of the newest of sciences, anthropology, appears to be rooted in the earliest strata of thought, as, for instance, among the natives of Central Australia. Greek speculation upon the origin and development of mankind was not limited to fairy-tales of the Golden Age type. From Herodotus onward their best minds had a very shrewd idea of the real process, such as we have come to see it. Lucretius repeated, with original observations of his own, the anthropological theories of Epicurus. But these are the culmination of Greek scientific thought in this direction. They were foreshadowed by Aeschylus and Herodotus, and developed later. It seems that the Greeks, who certainly had considerable opportunities, thanks to their trade, travel, and warfare, collected a considerable body of data relating to savage and barbarous peoples in the west, the east, and the south. There was, of course, another school, the Platonic; it was true then, as ever since, that a man is born either an Aristotelian or a Platonist. Then, too, as now, the Platonist built upon teleology. Mr. Sikes has done well to collect every statement in Greek literature that throws light on the scientific ideas of that “most quick” witted and curious of human races,” concerning the origin and development of their own species. It should he read by all anthropologists, whether their Greek is “less” or more.

(1) The Anthropology of the Greeks.

By E. E. Sikes. Pp. xii + 112. (London: David Nutt, 1914.) Price 5s. net.

(2) The Mechanistic Principle and the Non-mechanical.

By Paul Carus. Pp. 125. (Chicago and London: The Open Court Publishing Company. 1913.) Price 4s. net.

(3) Transformisme et Créationisme.

By Prof. J. L. de Lanessan. Pp. 352. (Paris: Librairie Felix Alcan, 1914.) Price 6 francs.

(4) A History of Education in Modern Times.

By Prof. F. P. Graves. Pp. xv + 410. (New York: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan and Co., Ltd., ii.) Price 5s. net.

(5) Methodik und Technik des naturgeschichtlichen Unterrichts.

By Prof. W. Schoenichen. Pp. xiv + 611 + 30 plates. (Leipzig: Quelle and Meyer, 1914.) Price 12 marks.

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CRAWLEY, A. (1) The Anthropology of the Greeks (2) The Mechanistic Principle and the Non-mechanical (3) Transformisme et Créationisme (4) A History of Education in Modern Times (5) Methodik und Technik des naturgeschichtlichen Unterrichts. Nature 94, 360–362 (1914). https://doi.org/10.1038/094360b0

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