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A Day in the Moon

Nature volume 92, page 422 (11 December 1913) | Download Citation

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Abstract

IN these pages the Abbe Moreux chats on the moon and all that is related to it, and the reader will find not only that the matter is displayed in a very readable form, but that he will have learnt numerous facts, and have had a very instructive lesson, by the time he has finished the volume. A NO. 23O25 VOL. 92] day in the moon refers actually to a lunar day, and the reader is transported to the moon and treated as if he were an inhabitant of that body. The author in this way introduces him to the mountaia ranges and craters, and other conspicuous high, and low lands which are brought into view as the solar rays illuminate them. Here and there are brought in incidentally interesting side issues, such as the probable use of lenses before ever Galileo or the inventor, a certain Dutchman, came to re-invent and use them. Bringing the reader-back to earth again, he introduces him to such themes as the tides, possible weather changes due to the moon, action of the moon on vegetation and organic life, and on men and animals, and finally concludes with a list of objects shown on a map of the moon, those to be studied on each day of a lunation, and the lunar elements. Numerous illustrations from photographs and the author's drawings accompany the text. The translator has done his work well, and has, in the form of footnotes, made many statements more clear to British readers, such as when references were made to the metric system of measurements, and to distances between French towns.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/092422b0

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