News | Published:

The Adamello Group1

Nature volume 81, pages 101102 (22 July 1909) | Download Citation

Subjects

Abstract

THE Adamello group is a conspicuous though distant feature in the panoramic view of snow-clad giants which greets us on reaching some lofty peak of the Pennine Alps in the neighbourhood of Zermatt. It rises like an island above a sea of lower mountains, almost untouched by snow—a vast tabular mass covered with glaciers, “a huge block,” to quote Mr. Douglas Freshfield's graphic description, “large enough to supply materials for half-a-dozen fine mountains. But it is, in fact, only one. For a length and breadth of many miles, the ground never falls below 9500 feet. The highest peaks (about 11,600 feet) … are merely slight elevations of the rim of this unlifted plain. … Imagine an enormous white cloth unevenly laid upon a table and its shining skirts hanging over here and there between the dark massive supports” (“The Italian Alps,” p. 202).

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/081101a0

Authors

  1. Search for T. G. B. in:

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing