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Forestry in the United Kingdom

Nature volume 70, page 269 (21 July 1904) | Download Citation

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Abstract

THIS book gives a very able exposition of the pressing need of extended and improved forestry in the United Kingdom. It deals with certain important points already discussed, as the author informs us, in lectures at various centres. Prof. Schlich sets forth a very strong case in favour of the better management of British woodlands. His arguments, supported by very convincing statistics, are such as should meet with the approval and support of all interested in the subject. The problem of how to utilise to the best advantage our enormous acreage of waste land is ably dealt with, and in our opinion settled by the author in chapter iii. This chapter contains a most interesting discussion on the conflicting interests of forests and game preserves; Prof. Schlich, however, shows how these may be reconciled. The chapter also contains numerous practical hints and yield tables showing the financial return to be expected from properly managed woods. We cannot close this notice without mentioning the excellent series of photographs illustrating the natural regeneration of beech, the production of high-class oak timber, and the proper density of spruce woods. The photographs have been judiciously chosen by the author, and included to show what result can be achieved when forests are treated in a rational and systematic manner.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/070269b0

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