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Nature volume 36, page 317 | Download Citation

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Abstract

SINCE Koch first employed photography in bacteriology (“Biol. d. Pflanzen,” 1877, ii. 3) various attempts have been made in this country and on the Continent to advance the methods of photographing microscopic objects, such as Bacteria, with high magnifying powers. About fifteen years ago Dr. Woodward, of Washington, published photographic plates of histological objects taken under tolerably high magnifying power (400 and 500 diameters). These plates were brought out by the Surgeon-General's Office, Army Medical Museum of the United States: they attracted at the time a good deal of attention owing to their comparatively high excellence. That good photographs of histological and other microscopic objects are of great value in themselves, owing to their exactness, and the various advantages for purposes of publication, may be taken as requiring no further proof, and it seems equally obvious that indifferent photographs are of less value than accurate drawings.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/036317a0

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