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    Naturevolume 18pages199200 (1878) | Download Citation

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    THE TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSES OF MAY 16, 1882, AND AUGUST 18, 1887.—There will be two total eclipses of the sun within the next ten years, which may be observed without entailing a long sea-voyage from this country. The first will take place on May 16 (or May 17, civil reckoning), 1882. In this eclipse the central line commences in long. 3° 11′ W., lat. 10° 40′ N.; totality will occur with the sun on the meridian in 63° 44′ E. and 38° 35′ N., and at sunset in 138° 51′ E. and 25° 25′ N. The. duration of total eclipse on this occasion is comparatively short. Probably if observers proceed from England to the central line, they would station themselves in Upper Egypt, not far from one of the points whence the late transit of Venus was successfully observed. In 32° E. and 26° 44′ N. close to this line, totality commences at 2oh. 32m. 45s. and continues im. 10s. At a point upon the same, not far from Sherm, at the extremity of the peninsula of Sinai, on the Gulf of Akaba, in 34° 28′ E., and 28° 2′ N., the duration of totality is im. 17s; The eclipse will be total at Teheran, for im 4s. with the sun at an altitude of 67°, commencing May 16, at 22h. 36m. ios. local mean time; the central line passes about fifteen miles south of this place. A total, eclipse may also be witnessed, though for a few seconds only, near Shanghai.

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    https://doi.org/10.1038/018199a0

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