Slow-wave sleep

Slow-wave sleep (SWS) refers to phase 3 sleep, which is the deepest phase of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and is characterized by delta waves (measured by EEG). Dreaming and sleepwalking can occur during SWS. SWS is thought to be important for memory consolidation.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Reviews |

    Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias are thought to derive from incomplete arousal from NREM sleep. Here, the authors present evidence for coexistence of sleep-like and wake-like brain activity in disorders of arousal, including confusional arousals, sleep terrors and sleepwalking.

    • Anna Castelnovo
    • , Régis Lopez
    • , Paola Proserpio
    • , Lino Nobili
    •  & Yves Dauvilliers
  • Research |

    A subset of synaptic proteins are cumulatively phosphorylated during wakefulness and dephosphorylated during sleep, in accordance with sleep need; this may represent a common mechanism underlying regulation of both synaptic homeostasis and sleep–wake homeostasis.

    • Zhiqiang Wang
    • , Jing Ma
    • , Chika Miyoshi
    • , Yuxin Li
    • , Makito Sato
    • , Yukino Ogawa
    • , Tingting Lou
    • , Chengyuan Ma
    • , Xue Gao
    • , Chiyu Lee
    • , Tomoyuki Fujiyama
    • , Xiaojie Yang
    • , Shuang Zhou
    • , Noriko Hotta-Hirashima
    • , Daniela Klewe-Nebenius
    • , Aya Ikkyu
    • , Miyo Kakizaki
    • , Satomi Kanno
    • , Liqin Cao
    • , Satoru Takahashi
    • , Junmin Peng
    • , Yonghao Yu
    • , Hiromasa Funato
    • , Masashi Yanagisawa
    •  & Qinghua Liu
    Nature 558, 435-439
  • Research | | open

    The ventromedial thalamus (VM) is thought to control cortical arousal through its diffuse projections to cortex. Here the authors record and manipulate the activity of calbindin1-positive matrix cells in VM and show that they bidirectionally regulate the sleep-wake transition.

    • Sakiko Honjoh
    • , Shuntaro Sasai
    • , Shannon S Schiereck
    • , Hirotaka Nagai
    • , Giulio Tononi
    •  & Chiara Cirelli
  • Reviews |

    During low-vigilance states, thalamic neurons exhibit diverse rhythmic activities that contribute to specific parts of the electroencephalogram rhythm. In this perspective, Crunelli and colleagues propose that thalamic oscillations of these low-vigilance states also have a plasticity function that modifies the strength of excitatory and inhibitory synapses in local neuronal assemblies.

    • Vincenzo Crunelli
    • , Magor L. Lőrincz
    • , William M. Connelly
    • , François David
    • , Stuart W. Hughes
    • , Régis C. Lambert
    • , Nathalie Leresche
    •  & Adam C. Errington
  • Research | | open

    Circulating hormones undergo fluctuations during sleep. Here, the authors increase electroencephalographic slow oscillations (SO) during sleep in men using an auditory closed-loop stimulation, and show that the circulating level of cortisol, aldosterone and immune cell count can be altered.

    • Luciana Besedovsky
    • , Hong-Viet V. Ngo
    • , Stoyan Dimitrov
    • , Christoph Gassenmaier
    • , Rainer Lehmann
    •  & Jan Born

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