Collections

  • Collection |

    This new collection of breast cancer papers shows the wide range of clinical studies and translational research published in the British Journal of Cancer. Curated by our Editor-in-Chief, Adrian Harris (University of Oxford), the studies range from the difficult decisions of treating breast cancer, how people respond to a false positive test and to recent advances in BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing. Work on the role of oestrogen receptor status and BRCA2 and new work on triple receptor negative breast cancer, the androgen receptor and long-term outcome is presented. New genotypes and predictors of response to immunotherapy, as well as early phase studies on HDAC inhibitors are described. Although, not a novel agent, the important role of biosimilars is shown, and finally research on myc and metabolism in breast cancer.

    Image: Adrian Harris (University of Oxford)
  • Collection |

    The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was jointly awarded to William G. Kaelin Jr, Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza “for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability”. Collectively, their research led to an understanding of the elegant mechanism cells use to respond to changes in oxygen levels, a fundamental process that underpins normal physiologic functioning and plays a critical role in several diseases, including cancer. Via a combination of oxygen-dependant targeted destruction of the Hypoxia Inducible Factor and modulation of gene expression, cells are equipped to survive in a fluctuating environment. This pioneering research helped pave the way towards a plethora of medications that target this pathway. In celebration of their success, we have featured some of their articles in this collection, which includes content from Oncogene, British Journal of Cancer, Pediatric Research, Gene Therapy, Cell Death and Disease, and the Journal of Human Hypertension.

    Image: Emw [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)]
  • Collection |

    September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month and in this Collection we highlight a selection of recent papers published in BJC focusing on research into children’s and young people’s cancers covering the epidemiology of cancer occurrence, insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying a variety of cancers affecting children and clinical trials highlighting potential treatments.

  • Collection |

    This Collection highlights the newest top-viewed content from BJC. Updated each month, we hope you enjoy reading this curated list of articles, which features content from across BJC’s six subject categories. BJC aims to serve as a forum for the sharing and discussion of developments in oncology, by publishing significant advances in translational and clinical cancer research, covering all aspects of cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Image: JUAN GAERTNER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY; KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
  • Collection |

    As an international journal, the British Journal of Cancer publishes articles on a wide range of cancer research from across the world. In this the first Regional Collection, we highlight a selection of recently published studies originating from authors residing in Asia, covering a wide range of subjects from clinical trials through to cell-based studies and from a variety of countries including China, Japan and South Korea and Taiwan among others.

    Image: JUAN GAERTNER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY; KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
  • Collection |

    Increasing Body Mass Index (BMI) is a growing problem from several perspectives. Although it is well known that tobacco smoking greatly increases cancer risk, today, a higher proportion of the global population is affected by increased BMI, and a developing body of evidence now supports the role played by BMI in the risk of a large number of different cancers.

  • Collection |

    The British Journal of Cancer publishes articles on a wide range of cancer research, including basic biology of therapeutic relevance, translational research, early- and late-phase trials, epidemiology, and precision medicine. Updated each month, our Editor's Pick showcases a curated selection of those articles which are stimulating the most interest via electronic communication and other methods. This Collection reflects the diversity, quality and relevance of the articles published in BJC. We hope you enjoy reading this Collection, and we welcome your correspondence on these studies.

    Image: JUAN GAERTNER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY; KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
  • Collection |

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is a leading global cause of cancer death. Efforts to understand the drivers of CRC have uncovered several genetic determinants, but further work is needed to further elucidate its genetic aetiology, and to identify high risk individuals. Four new studies, supported by the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) framework, are presented in this dedicated Collection on CRC cancer genetics. In the accompanying editorial, Luis Carvajal-Carmona (UC Davis, California) assesses their impact, and highlights the need for collaborative international research efforts to answer complex clinical questions.

    Image: JUAN GAERTNER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY; KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
  • Collection |

    On World Cancer Day , we present some of our top cited content from the last year. This selection reflects developing and ongoing trends in the cancer research community, including liquid biopsies, cancer metabolism, and our growing understanding of the immune system and immunotherapy. We hope you enjoy reading our Editor’s highlights, as we look forward to another year of exciting developments.

  • Collection |

    To mark the launch of our new Cellular and Molecular Biology section in the British Journal of Cancer, we present a series of articles to highlight our best research and reviews in this area.

    Image: Colin Goding (Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of Oxford)
  • Collection |

    Immunotherapies have revolutionised therapy for some cancers.In particular, antibodies that block signals that reduce inhibition of T cell function, have led to complete regressions that are maintained for years, in melanoma and now in bladder cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Recently, chimeric antigen receptor T cells have produced remarkable responses in patients who have failed multiple other therapies. In parallel with therapeutic trials, many other mechanisms and pathways are being investigated in optimising these treatments.Many of these areas are covered in this collection of papers and reviews.