News and Views

Bioelectronic devices: Wirelessly powered implants

Phased-array antennas that conform to body surfaces efficiently transfer electromagnetic energy to miniaturized semiconductor devices implanted in pigs.

  • Subscribe to Nature Biomedical Engineering for full access:

    $99

    Subscribe

Additional access options:

Already a subscriber?  Log in  now or  Register  for online access.

References

  1. 1.

    VLSI Circuits for Biomedical Applications (Artech House, 2008).

  2. 2.

    et al. IEEE Trans. Ultrasonics Ferroelectrics Frequency Control 60, 587–595 (2013).

  3. 3.

    et al. Nat. Biomed. Eng. 1, 0043 (2017).

  4. 4.

    et al. IEEE Trans. Circuits Sys. I: Reg. Papers 62, 1950–1958 (2015).

  5. 5.

    et al. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 111, 7974–7979 (2014).

  6. 6.

    , , , & J. Neurosci. Methods 244, 114–122 (2015).

  7. 7.

    , & Ultrasound Med. Biol. 5, 181–186 (1979).

  8. 8.

    Compilation of the Dielectric Properties of Body Tissues at RF and Microwave Frequencies (DTIC Document, 1996).

  9. 9.

    & Ultrasound Med. Biol. 2, 25–29 (1975).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Jordan Thimot and Kenneth L. Shepard are in the Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA.

    • Jordan Thimot
    •  & Kenneth L. Shepard

Authors

  1. Search for Jordan Thimot in:

  2. Search for Kenneth L. Shepard in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Kenneth L. Shepard.