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Marine microbiology: Community clean up

Nature Microbiology volume 1, Article number: 16102 (2016) | Download Citation

A combination of metagenomics and stable isotope probing provides new insight into the community-wide degradation of hydrocarbons released during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Rachel Mackelprang is in the Department of Biology, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge California 91330, USA.

    • Rachel Mackelprang
  2. Olivia U. Mason is at Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4520, USA.

    • Olivia U. Mason

Authors

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Rachel Mackelprang.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.102

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