Health policy

Health policy is the set of decisions and plans, developed by governmental or nongovernmental agencies, designed to promote specific health-care objectives. Policies can be directed at individuals, physicians, pharmaceutical companies, or health-care systems. Examples include tobacco control policies and those designed to promote equal opportunites to access care.

Latest Research and Reviews

News and Comment

  • Comments and Opinion |

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Essential Medicines List (EML) informs policy makers about which medications should be prioritized and is particularly important for countries with limited resources. However, the EML lacks vital medicines used in paediatric rheumatology, the inclusion of which could transform the lives of many children around the world.

    • Helen E. Foster
    •  & Christiaan Scott
  • Comments and Opinion |

    Big Data may revolutionize social science—and also amplify our deepest cultural biases.

    • Bapu Vaitla
    • , Stefaan Verhulst
    • , Linus Bengtsson
    • , Marta C. González
    • , Rebecca Furst-Nichols
    •  & Emily Courey Pryor
    Nature Medicine 26, 17-18
  • Comments and Opinion
    | Open Access

    • Evelyn A Brakema
    • , Rianne Mjj van der Kleij
    • , Debbie Vermond
    • , Frederik A van Gemert
    • , Bruce Kirenga
    • , Niels H Chavannes
    • , Pham Le An
    • , Marilena Anastasaki
    • , Azamat Akylbekov
    • , Andy Barton
    • , Antonios Bertsias
    • , Pham Duong Uyen Binh
    • , Job F M van Boven
    • , Dennis Burges
    • , Lucy Cartwright
    • , Vasiliki E Chatzea
    • , Liza Cragg
    • , Tran Ngoc Dang
    • , Ilyas Dautov
    • , Berik Emilov
    • , Irene Ferarrio
    • , Ben Hedrick
    • , Le Huynh Thi Cam Hong
    • , Nick Hopkinson
    • , Elvira Isaeva
    • , Rupert Jones
    • , Corina de Jong
    • , Sanne van Kampen
    • , Winceslaus Katagira
    • , Jesper Kjærgaard
    • , Janwillem Kocks
    • , Le Thi Tuyet Lan
    • , Tran Thanh Duv Linh
    • , Christos Lionis
    • , Kim Xuan Loan
    • , Maamed Mademilov
    • , Andy McEwen
    • , Patrick Musinguzi
    • , Rebecca Nantanda
    • , Grace Ndeezi
    • , Sophia Papadakis
    • , Hilary Pinnock
    • , Jillian Pooler
    • , Charlotte C Poot
    • , Maarten J Postma
    • , Anja Poulsen
    • , Pippa Powell
    • , Nguyen Nhat Quynh
    • , Susanne Reventlow
    • , Dimitra Sifaki-Pistolla
    • , Sally Singh
    • , Talant Sooronbaev
    • , Jaime Correia de Sousa
    • , James Stout
    • , Marianne Stubbe Østergaard
    • , Aizhamal Tabyshova
    • , Ioanna Tsiligianni
    • , Tran Diep Tuan
    • , James Tumwine
    • , Le Thanh Van
    • , Nguyen Nhu Vinh
    • , Simon Walusimbi
    • , Louise Warren
    •  & Sian Williams
  • Comments and Opinion |

    Shortages of drugs, including chemotherapeutics, are increasingly common in the USA, and compromise patient care, delay clinical trials and are associated with substantial financial costs. The recent shortage of vincristine, a chemotherapeutic used for most children with cancer and countless adult patients, presents a particularly vexing challenge. Drug shortages can cause patients unnecessary anxiety and challenge clinicians to ration lifesaving medications for which no alternative agent exists. We provide an overview of this problem and discuss potential solutions.

    • Erin R. Fox
    •  & Yoram Unguru