News & Comment

  • Editorial |

    Geohazards can be too dangerous to study directly but too deadly to ignore. For these types of events, data from physical experiments can plug gaps in both hazard models and understanding.

  • News & Views |

    The Toarcian oceanic anoxic event disrupted terrestrial ecosystems as well as the marine realm, according to analyses of microfossils derived from land plants. Changes in diversity and composition were initially more rapid in terrestrial ecosystems.

    • Luke Mander
    •  & Jennifer C. McElwain
  • News & Views |

    The Moon’s isotopic composition is uncannily similar to Earth’s. This may be the signature of a magma ocean on Earth at the time of the Moon-forming giant impact, according to numerical simulations.

    • H. Jay Melosh
  • News & Views |

    Nitrogen deposition in China has stabilized over the past decade, thanks to efficient regulation of fertilizer use, suggests an analysis of wet and dry deposition.

    • Maria Kanakidou
  • News & Views |

    Flotation of aerosols as a film on the hydrocarbon lakes of Saturn’s moon Titan may explain the lakes’ stillness, and could influence the atmospheric hydrocarbon cycle.

    • Isabelle Couturier-Tamburelli
  • News & Views |

    Pyroclastic density currents generate a basal air cushion that reduces friction with the ground, reveal laboratory experiments. This explains their ability to travel rapidly over large distances from their volcanic source.

    • Alain Burgisser
  • Editorial |

    Near-Earth asteroid Bennu is one of a range of bodies in the Solar System to have been reached by space missions in the past months. Crowd-sourcing technologies can help with the exploration of its surface.

  • Correspondence |

    • Weiren Wu
    • , Chunlai Li
    • , Wei Zuo
    • , Hongbo Zhang
    • , Jianjun Liu
    • , Weibin Wen
    • , Yan Su
    • , Xin Ren
    • , Jun Yan
    • , Dengyun Yu
    • , Guangliang Dong
    • , Chi Wang
    • , Zezhou Sun
    • , Enhai Liu
    • , Jianfeng Yang
    •  & Ziyuan Ouyang
  • News & Views |

    Thinning and retreat of Jakobshavn Isbræ has reversed in 2016, in tandem with regional ocean cooling.

    • Rebecca H. Jackson
  • News & Views |

    A chemically distinct region separates the Indian and Pacific mantle domains as revealed by isotope analyses on rare samples from the Australian–Antarctic Ridge.

    • Pamela D. Kempton
  • Editorial |

    Two tsunamis generated by distinct geohazards struck Indonesia within six months and killed thousands. Early-warning systems established after 2004 have not prevented devastation.

  • News & Views |

    A magnitude 7.5 strike-slip earthquake that struck Palu, Indonesia, in 2018 unexpectedly generated a devastating tsunami. Seismic data reveal that its rupture propagated fast, at supershear speed. Whether the two are connected remains to be seen.

    • P. Martin Mai
  • Editorial |

    Wildfires are a natural part of many ecosystems, but they can become destructive and less predictable, especially when the system is perturbed. Human activities and climate change lead to interactions with fire dynamics that need our attention.

  • News & Views |

    Transition from a weak and erratic geomagnetic field to a more stable one around 560 million years ago, inferred from palaeomagnetic measurements, suggests that the inner core may have solidified around that time, much later than thought.

    • Peter Driscoll
  • News & Views |

    Differences between earthquake sequences in the crust and adjacent uppermost mantle at oceanic transform faults are revealed by a seafloor seismic experiment at the Blanco Transform Fault.

    • Jeffrey J. McGuire
  • News & Views |

    Cumulative wildfires or prescribed burning produce different outcomes for the vegetation, suggest two long-term analyses of fire-affected ecosystems. Climate change and land management practices are altering how ecosystems function.

    • Mark A. Cochrane
  • News & Views |

    Atmospheric levels of chloroform, an ozone-depleting substance not part of the Montreal Protocol, have risen. The increase may be attributable to industrial emissions in Eastern China.

    • Susann Tegtmeier
  • News & Views |

    Mangrove canopy heights vary around the world in response to rain, storms and human activities, suggests a global analysis of mangrove canopy height. How tall the trees are matters for estimating global mangrove carbon storage.

    • Daniel A. Friess
  • Editorial |

    Machine learning allows geoscientists to embrace data at scales greater than ever before. We are excited to see what this innovative tool can teach us.

  • News & Views |

    Seismic data during the time interval between larger earthquakes could contain information about fault displacements and potential for future failure, suggest analyses of data from laboratory and real-world slow-slip earthquakes using machine-learning techniques.

    • Kenneth C. Creager
  • Correspondence |

    • Fabian B. Wadsworth
    • , Edward W. Llewellin
    • , Colin Rennie
    •  & Cate Watkinson
  • Editorial |

    Past and future changes in tropical cyclones and the damage they cause are fiendishly difficult to detect and project. For the Atlantic, progress is being made; other ocean basins lag behind.

  • News & Views |

    Most of the net water transferred over the past 15 years from non-glaciated land to the oceans has originated from landlocked basins, according to satellite data. This source of sea-level rise is often overlooked.

    • Tamlin M. Pavelsky
  • News & Views |

    Extreme temperature swings and deteriorating environments are perhaps what killed most life in the end-Permian extinction, suggest climate model simulations. Siberian Traps volcanism probably triggered the events.

    • Ying Cui
  • News & Views |

    During flat subduction, material is scraped off the base of the continental mantle lithosphere, building a migrating keel. This testable mechanism for flat subduction recreates features of the Laramide orogeny.

    • Marc-André Gutscher
  • Editorial |

    Fifty years of international ocean drilling have brought enormous insights into the workings of our planet. Incorporating young investigators’ ideas, cooperating internationally and sharing data and samples have been key to this success.

  • News & Views |

    Ice buried deep within the ice sheet on Antarctica preserves clues to past climatic change dating back more than a million years. A recent workshop discussed the challenges — and hopes — of drilling to these buried treasures.

    • Dorthe Dahl-Jensen
  • Editorial |

    Increasing numbers of geoscientists are nurturing an online presence. Nature Geoscience explores the potential benefits of taking your professional life online.

  • News & Views |

    While anthropogenic influence on global climate is clear, human impact on the Southern Ocean has been difficult to pin down. A new detection and attribution study achieves just that.

    • Nathaniel L. Bindoff
  • News & Views |

    The Laurentide Ice Sheet sapped the strength of the North American monsoon during the last ice age, but the ice sheet’s grip on the monsoon weakened as it retreated northwards.

    • Sarah E. Metcalfe
  • Editorial |

    As Peer Review Week approaches, Nature Geoscience takes the opportunity to thank its peer reviewers and contemplate how their vital work can be better supported.

  • Comment |

    Field work is an important and valued part of geoscience research, but can also serve as a source of stress. Careful planning can help support the mental health and wellness of participants at all career stages.

    • Cédric Michaël John
    •  & Saira Bano Khan
  • News & Views |

    Droughts lead to enhanced water-use efficiency and reduced carbon uptake by plants. Global analyses of atmospheric CO2 monitoring data suggest that the scale of the trade-off between water and carbon extends to a biome level.

    • Christopher J. Still
  • Editorial |

    Earth’s resources may not be running out, but the planet’s capacity to cope with the resulting waste products is limited. Resource geology can no longer be the preserve of the economic, mining or petroleum geologist; sustainably providing for the world’s population requires a broader skillset.

  • News & Views |

    Strong anisotropy within the source region of deep earthquakes explains their apparent non-pure shear faulting mechanism.

    • Barbara Romanowicz
  • News & Views |

    Rainfall interception by vegetation is an underappreciated part of the terrestrial hydrological cycle. Numerical modelling shows that non-vascular plants, such as lichens, substantially increase the interception capacity of the land surface.

    • Hubert H. G. Savenije
  • News & Views |

    Plants influence geomorphology. Research on salt marshes suggests that feedbacks between geomorphic processes and life-history traits of plants produce species-specific signatures in the organization of biogeomorphic landscapes.

    • Dov Corenblit
  • News & Views |

    There was minimal cooling in the North Atlantic Ocean during the Oligocene inception of the Antarctic ice sheet, according to a sediment record. This finding suggests asynchronous climate changes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

    • Timothy Herbert
  • News & Views |

    Much of the carbon in rivers originates from wildfires and is ultimately buried in the oceanic carbon sink, suggest measurements from 18 rivers globally. Rivers transport almost a gigaton of carbon to the oceans every year.

    • Lars J. Tranvik
  • Comment |

    January 2018 was an unusually warm and wet month across the Western Alps, with widespread landslides at low elevations and massive snowfall higher up. This extreme month yields lessons for how mountain communities can prepare for a warmer future.

    • Markus Stoffel
    •  & Christophe Corona
  • Editorial |

    A high percentage of international collaborations in a country’s research output can be a sign of excellent networks, or of a reliance on know-how imports. Caution is needed in the latter case, but international collaborations make research more powerful.