Volume 3 Issue 1, January 2019

Volume 3 Issue 1

Neurofeedback for soldiers

Improving emotional regulation is a critical skill in response to stress. A study in this issue shows that soldiers in combat training who undergo electroencephalography-based neurofeedback training of amygdala activity improve their ability to regulate emotion, a skill that may protect them from future psychiatric disorders.

See Keynan et al. See also News and Views by Young.

Image: Yaara Shattner, Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design. Cover Design: Bethany Vukomanovic.

Editorial

  • Editorial |

    Understanding how humans behave, why we behave the way we do, what the consequences of our behaviour are and how behaviour can change are complex, multi-faceted questions, addressed by numerous diverse disciplines that rely on different methods and types of data. We welcome them all in the journal.

Correspondence

Comment & Opinion

Research Highlights

News & Views

  • News & Views |

    A study shows that knowledge about an object’s size — how large it is in the real world — changes how people allocate attention towards the space occupied by a drawing of the object.

    • Soojin Park
  • News & Views |

    There is wide interest in the social norms construct across psychology, economics, law and social marketing. Now a study investigates an important missing piece in the social norms’ puzzle: what is the underlying process that explains how norms impact behaviour? The answer: self–other similarity (self-categorization) and internalization.

    • Katherine J. Reynolds
  • News & Views |

    A new study shows that undergoing electroencephalography-based neurofeedback training of amygdala activity leads to an improved ability to regulate emotion in soldiers during combat training, a skill that may prevent future psychiatric disorders.

    • Kymberly D. Young
  • News & Views |

    Cultural products have a life of their own: academic papers get cited and songs get downloaded. Surprisingly, public attention to these products shows a consistent pattern over time: a constant decline characterized by an inflexion point. This pattern might be due to how cultural products are discussed in the community and archived as cultural memories.

    • Alin Coman
  • News & Views |

    Does tweeting your feelings change how you feel? A study of over a billion tweets shows that we tend to tweet about our feelings after they have escalated. However, such ‘affect labeling’ tweets — even though they are constrained to 140 characters — lead to rapid reductions in the intensity of our emotions.

    • Matthew D. Lieberman
  • News & Views |

    Understanding what enables teams to flourish has been the focus of considerable interest across domains of human behaviour. A study finds that, in addition to recruiting and retaining highly skilled members, shared prior success significantly contributes to enhanced team performance.

    • Mark R. Beauchamp

Reviews

  • Perspective |

    Russ et al. discuss the broad applications of data science to mental health research and consider future ways that big data can improve detection, diagnosis, treatment, healthcare provision and disease management.

    • Tom C. Russ
    • , Eva Woelbert
    • , Katrina A. S. Davis
    • , Jonathan D. Hafferty
    • , Zina Ibrahim
    • , Becky Inkster
    • , Ann John
    • , William Lee
    • , Margaret Maxwell
    • , Andrew M. McIntosh
    • , Rob Stewart
    • , Margaret Anderson
    • , Kate Aylett
    • , Suzy Bourke
    • , Anna Burhouse
    • , Felicity Callard
    • , Kathy Chapman
    • , Matt Cowley
    • , James Cusack
    • , Katrina A. S. Davis
    • , Jaime Delgadillo
    • , Sophie Dix
    • , Richard Dobson
    • , Gary Donohoe
    • , Nadine Dougall
    • , Johnny Downs
    • , Helen Fisher
    • , Amos Folarin
    • , Thomas Foley
    • , John Geddes
    • , Joardana Globerman
    • , Jonathan D. Hafferty
    • , Lamiece Hassan
    • , Joseph Hayes
    • , Helen Hodges
    • , Zina Ibrahim
    • , Becky Inkster
    • , Eddie Jacob
    • , Rowena Jacobs
    • , Ann John
    • , Cynthia Joyce
    • , Suky Kaur
    • , Maximilian Kerz
    • , James Kirkbride
    • , Gerard Leavey
    • , Glyn Lewis
    • , Keith Lloyd
    • , Wendy Matcham
    • , Margaret Maxwell
    • , Erin McCloskey
    • , Andrew M. McIntosh
    • , Andrew McQuillin
    • , Tamsin Newlove Delgado
    • , Catherine Newsome
    • , Kristin Nicodemus
    • , David Porteous
    • , Daniel Ray
    • , Tom C. Russ
    • , Simran Sanhu
    • , Daniel Smith
    • , Robert Stewart
    • , Laura Tutu
    • , Ayath Ullah
    • , Bill Vance
    • , Eva Woelbert
    • , Miranda Wolpert
    • , Cathy Wyse
    •  & Stanley Zammit
  • Review Article |

    Natural field experiments combine randomized control with an absence of observer effects. However, they have only been used to investigate key labour market phenomena such as unemployment since the early 2000s. This paper reviews the literature and summarizes the insights natural field experiments contribute to the field of unemployment.

    • Omar Al-Ubaydli
    •  & John A. List

Research

  • Letter |

    Nearby small objects appear larger than distal large objects, reflecting a dissociation between perceived and actual object size. Collegio et al. show that inferences of true object size scale spatial attention to objects.

    • Andrew J. Collegio
    • , Joseph C. Nah
    • , Paul S. Scotti
    •  & Sarah Shomstein
  • Letter |

    Randomly informing people that they had a high or low genetic risk of obesity changed their gene-related physiology and subjective experience in a manner consistent with the perceived risk, regardless of their actual genetic risk of obesity.

    • Bradley P. Turnwald
    • , J. Parker Goyer
    • , Danielle Z. Boles
    • , Amy Silder
    • , Scott L. Delp
    •  & Alia J. Crum
  • Letter |

    Pryor et al. show that people conform to social norms, even when they understand that the norms have been determined arbitrarily and do not reflect people’s actual preferences. Prominent, rationality-based explanations of norm effects cannot explain these results.

    • Campbell Pryor
    • , Amy Perfors
    •  & Piers D. L. Howe
  • Letter |

    A new study by Keynan and colleagues provides evidence that training in amygdala self-regulation via EEG neurofeedback (‘electrical fingerprint’) results in neurobehavioural markers of stress resilience in a cohort of individuals undergoing military training.

    • Jackob N. Keynan
    • , Avihay Cohen
    • , Gilan Jackont
    • , Nili Green
    • , Noam Goldway
    • , Alexander Davidov
    • , Yehudit Meir-Hasson
    • , Gal Raz
    • , Nathan Intrator
    • , Eyal Fruchter
    • , Keren Ginat
    • , Eugene Laska
    • , Marc Cavazza
    •  & Talma Hendler
  • Letter |

    Analysing the results from four major sports leagues and a multiplayer online game reveals that prior shared success as a team significantly improves the odds of winning beyond what is explained by the skill of individual players.

    • Satyam Mukherjee
    • , Yun Huang
    • , Julia Neidhardt
    • , Brian Uzzi
    •  & Noshir Contractor
  • Article |

    The attention received by cultural products—including scientific papers, patents, songs, movies and biographies—decays following a biexponential function, suggesting that collective memory follows a universal pattern.

    • Cristian Candia
    • , C. Jara-Figueroa
    • , Carlos Rodriguez-Sickert
    • , Albert-László Barabási
    •  & César A. Hidalgo
  • Article |

    Bollen et al. tracked changes in the emotions of Twitter users before and after they expressed a feeling online. Emotions grow quickly before—and decrease rapidly after—their expression, confirming previous affect labeling studies showing that putting one’s feelings into words can alleviate their intensity.

    • Rui Fan
    • , Onur Varol
    • , Ali Varamesh
    • , Alexander Barron
    • , Ingrid A. van de Leemput
    • , Marten Scheffer
    •  & Johan Bollen

Amendments & Corrections