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Maurizio Pajola et al. ESA/Rosetta/MPS/OSIRIS MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

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Latest Research

  • Article |

    Using an innovative method, the mass of a pulsar can be constrained using the maximum ‘glitch’ in the star’s rotational frequency: the bigger the glitch, the lower the mass. This method is used to estimate the mass of all observed glitchers.

    • P. M. Pizzochero
    • , M. Antonelli
    • , B. Haskell
    •  & S. Seveso
  • Letter |

    Orbital parameters for the seventh Earth-sized transiting planet around star TRAPPIST-1 are reported, along with an investigation into the complex three-body resonances linking every member of this planetary system.

    • Rodrigo Luger
    • , Marko Sestovic
    • , Ethan Kruse
    • , Simon L. Grimm
    • , Brice-Olivier Demory
    • , Eric Agol
    • , Emeline Bolmont
    • , Daniel Fabrycky
    • , Catarina S. Fernandes
    • , Valérie Van Grootel
    • , Adam Burgasser
    • , Michaël Gillon
    • , James G. Ingalls
    • , Emmanuël Jehin
    • , Sean N. Raymond
    • , Franck Selsis
    • , Amaury H. M. J. Triaud
    • , Thomas Barclay
    • , Geert Barentsen
    • , Steve B. Howell
    • , Laetitia Delrez
    • , Julien de Wit
    • , Daniel Foreman-Mackey
    • , Daniel L. Holdsworth
    • , Jérémy Leconte
    • , Susan Lederer
    • , Martin Turbet
    • , Yaseen Almleaky
    • , Zouhair Benkhaldoun
    • , Pierre Magain
    • , Brett M. Morris
    • , Kevin Heng
    •  & Didier Queloz
  • Article |

    The origin of Galactic positrons that produce gamma ray emission when annihilated is still debated. Mergers of two white dwarfs are likely to be the main source of these positrons. Such mergers produce sub-luminous, thermonuclear supernovae.

    • Roland M. Crocker
    • , Ashley J. Ruiter
    • , Ivo R. Seitenzahl
    • , Fiona H. Panther
    • , Stuart Sim
    • , Holger Baumgardt
    • , Anais Möller
    • , David M. Nataf
    • , Lilia Ferrario
    • , J. J. Eldridge
    • , Martin White
    • , Brad E. Tucker
    •  & Felix Aharonian
  • Letter |

    ALMA observations of TW Hydrae in the 13C18O J = 3–2 molecular line probe the mid-plane of the circumstellar disk where giant planets are expected to form. With other lines, the gas mass distribution, temperature and the gas-to-dust ratio are determined.

    • Ke Zhang
    • , Edwin A. Bergin
    • , Geoffrey A. Blake
    • , L. Ilsedore Cleeves
    •  & Kamber R. Schwarz
  • Review Article |

    Planetary nebulae, traditionally seen as an endpoint of single stars, exhibit a variety of morphologies that cannot be explained in a single-star scenario. It is becoming clearer that perhaps even the majority of planetary nebulae result from binary interactions.

    • David Jones
    •  & Henri M. J. Boffin

News & Comment

  • Mission Control |

    Woken from the deep sleep of a hibernated spacecraft, NEOWISE now monitors the population of near-Earth objects for science and Earth protection purposes, explains Principal Investigator Amy Mainzer.

    • Amy Mainzer
  • Editorial |

    Scientists are beyond concerned. We are angry about the cuts to fundamental research and the decline in scientific literacy among politicians. But protesting isn't everything — we also need to adapt to change and engage with the public.

  • News and Views |

    Images from ESA's Rosetta mission show, in real time, the processes that sculpt the surface of a comet, which is revealed to have a pristine icy interior surrounded by an evolved surface.

    • Marco Delbo

Current Issue

Volume 1 Issue 5

Maurizio Pajola et al. ESA/Rosetta/MPS/OSIRIS MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA Design: A. Wing

Volume 1 Issue 5

Cometary catastrophes

Rosetta’s cameras captured the collapse of a cliff on the nucleus of comet 67P in near real time, unambiguously connecting it with an outburst of cometary activity.  This landslide also exposed the fresh icy material of the interior of the comet, formed in the cold part of our Solar System roughly 4.5 billion years ago.

See Pajola et al. 1, 92 (2017).

 

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