Focus Collections

Welcome to the Communications Physics Focus Collections page. Our Focus Collections are guest edited by leading researchers in the field, and aim at providing a venue for the latest and most exciting works on specific research topics while enhancing their visibility to the community. 

Published Collection papers are highlighted on our Collection page.

Open Focus Collections

Focus Collections will be listed below as they are open for submissions. Find out more about how to submit your research on this page.

 

Floquet engineering of quantum materials

Guest Editors

James McIver (Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Germany)

Monika Aidelsburger (Ludwig-Maximilians University, Germany)

Martin Claassen (University of Pennsylvania, USA)

 

The manipulation of solid-state systems using coherent light-matter interaction has recently garnered much attention as a way to steer the delicate balance of kinetics, frustration, spin-orbit coupling or competing interactions. Strong periodic drives, such as those provided by the AC fields in ultrafast optical pulses, can dress the electronic or atomic degrees of freedom in a quantum system and thereby induce a controlled modification of the microscopic interactions, to stabilize non-equilibrium states with tailored macroscopic properties, which in certain cases go beyond what is accessible in their static counterparts.

In recent years, pioneering theoretical and experimental works showed that the method of periodic driving, so-called ‘Floquet engineering’, opens the door to a plethora of new phenomena in quantum materials and quantum simulations, ranging from the prediction and observation of novel non-equilibrium topological states of matter and engineering of correlated quantum phases, to posing new and fundamental questions regarding heating and quantum thermalization. This focus collection strives to provide and curate, as a single resource, a venue for latest research and interesting findings on Floquet engineering of quantum systems, with an emphasis on but not exclusive to solid state systems, as well as challenges in their realization in light of heating, dissipation and bath coupling. Targeting physicists working broadly on quantum materials and non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of solid state and cold atomic systems, we believe that this collection can serve as an important reference and roadmap for the next years.

Important dates and information

Focus Collection articles are invite-based. However, if you are interested in submitting an article to the issue, please contact the Guest Editors. Contributions are welcome from February 5th to August 1st, 2021, and accepted papers are published on a rolling basis as soon as they are ready. 

All contributions should report new, original results, and will be subject to the same review process and high standard as regular Communications Physics articles. We are not seeking review material at this stage but we will consider relevant commentaries and review articles if a case is made for it and in agreement with the guest editors and editorial team.

Submit your paper

Please read the Focus Collection policies page before submitting, and make sure your article is prepared according to our Submission Guidelines and formatted as detailed here.  

To submit your invited manuscript as part of this Collection, once logged into our online submission system, select “Article” under the article type.  Fill in all information as for any regular submission. At step “2. Manuscript Information” in the submission form, under the tab “c) Subjects and Techniques” chose the Collection title from the drop down menu. You can also specify that your manuscript is invited for the "Floquet engineering of quantum materials" Collection under “Previous interactions” in the "d) Detailed information" tab. Authors should express their interest in the Collection in the cover letter.

As an Open Access journal, Communications Physics offers an optional transparent peer review system, and is supported by Article Processing Charges. Should your work be accepted for publication you will therefore be asked for this fee. Further information about article charges and waivers are available here.

In addition to papers on the Floquet engineering of quantum materials, Communications Physics welcomes original research in the field of quantum materials. 

About the Guest Editors

James McIver received his PhD in 2014 from Harvard University, where he studied the nonlinear optical and optoelectronic properties of topological insulators. He then joined the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) as a Humboldt postdoctoral fellow, during which time he investigated the electrical transport properties of topological Floquet-Bloch bands in graphene. He currently leads the Ultrafast Quantum Transport group at MPSD as a member of the Max Planck—New York Center for Non-equilibrium Quantum Phenomena. His research interests include Floquet-engineered transport phenomena in optically driven quantum materials.

Monika Aidelsburger received her PhD in 2015 from the Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) in Munich, where she developed novel experimental techniques to realize topological lattice models with ultracold atoms in optical lattices. She then joined Collège de France in Paris as a Marie-Curie postdoctoral fellow, where she studied homogeneous 2D Bose gases out-of-equilibrium. In 2017 she returned to LMU as a group leader, where she worked on topological Floquet systems and many-body localization. She has received an ERC Starting Grant from the European Commission for simulating lattice gauge theories with ultracold fermions. Since 2019 she is a tenure-track professor at LMU.

Martin Claassen is an Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his PhD in 2017 from Stanford University, and was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Computational Quantum Physics at the Simons Foundation Flatiron Institute in New York, before moving to Penn in 2020. His research focuses on theories of non-equilibrium dynamics and correlated phases in quantum systems, including Floquet states of matter and non-equilibrium realizations of topological phases.

 

Space quantum communication

Guest Editors

Siddarth Koduru Joshi (University of Bristol’s Quantum Engineering Technology labs -QET labs)

James A Grieve (Quantum Research Centre, Technology Innovation Institute, Abu Dhabi)

Erik Kerstel (University of Grenoble Alps)

 

The internet was a life changing technology and its next avatar, the quantum internet, will be more secure and link together far more powerful devices. Ultimately, such a quantum network will distribute quantum states and entanglement on a global scale, necessarily involving quantum satellite links.

Quantum communication --the driving force behind the deployment of the quantum internet-- offers mathematically perfect security and as such is one of the most anticipated disruptive technologies. However extending this to a global scale communication network, including long distance communication, faces significant challenges. For the foreseeable future, all large scale quantum networks will include satellite quantum communication: the focus of this collection. Several research groups, governments and companies are heavily invested in space quantum communication and there are many planned quantum satellite launches. 

This collection will cover research in supporting technologies, new quantum protocols, inter-satellite QKD, constellations of satellites, and quantum inspired technologies and protocols for space based communication. The goal is to support developments during all major steps including, but not limited to, novel feasibility studies, field tests, space qualification of components/systems, time/clock synchronisation, and a variety of mobile platforms. Space based quantum communications platforms may host tests of fundamental physics, and such work is also welcome. The collection aspires to present an important overview of the state-of-the-art of the field, and to be an authoritative reference for the near future.

Important dates and information

Focus Collection articles are invite-based. However, if you are interested in submitting an article to the issue, please contact the Guest Editors. Contributions are welcome from October 20, 2020 to October  31, 2021, and accepted papers are published on a rolling basis as soon as they are ready.  Early submissions will not be held from publication at any point upon their acceptance for publication. 

All contributions should report new, original results, and will be subject to the same review process and high standard as regular Communications Physics articlesWe are not seeking review material at this stage but we will consider relevant commentaries and review articles if a case is made for it and in agreement with the guest editors and editorial team.

Submit your paper

Please read the Focus Collection policies page before submitting, and make sure your article is prepared according to our Submission Guidelines and formatted as detailed here.  

To submit your invited manuscript as part of this Collection, once logged into our online submission system, select “Article” under the article type.  Fill in all information as for any regular submission. At step “2. Manuscript Information” in the submission form, under the tab “c) Subjects and Techniques” chose the Collection title from the drop down menu. You can also specify that your manuscript is invited for the "Space Quantum Communication" Collection under “Previous interactions” in the "d) Detailed information" tab. Authors should express their interest in the Collection in the cover letter.

As an Open Access journal, Communications Physics offers an optional transparent peer review system, and is supported by Article Processing Charges. Should your work be accepted for publication you will therefore be asked for this fee. Further information about article charges and waivers are available here.

In addition to papers on space quantum communications, Communications Physics welcomes original research in the field of  quantum optics. 

About the Guest Editors

Siddarth Koduru Joshi is a Research Fellow at University of Bristol’s Quantum Engineering Technology labs (QET labs). He works in quantum enhanced sensing & metrology and quantum communication. He has worked on 4 quantum communication cubesat projects and is the science team leader for an ESA selected mission to the International Space Station to test fundamental quantum physics. He also works on long distance fibre optic quantum communication, many-user quantum networks and their protocols. Siddarth  completed his PhD in NUS Singapore on loophole free Bell tests, a postdoc at IQOQI in Vienna and he is currently part of UK’s national quantum communication hub and quantum imaging hub.

James Grieve is a principal investigator at the Quantum Research Centre, Technology Innovation Institute, Abu Dhabi, and a visiting associate research professor at the Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore. His research centres around the practical implementation of quantum communications technologies, including both fibre-based and satellite quantum key distribution. He was involved in Singapore’s SpooQy-1 nanosatellite mission, and his current activities include developing ground station technology for future quantum satellite missions. He obtained his PhD from the University of Bristol in 2012.

Erik Kerstel is full professor of physics at the University of Grenoble Alps and director for science and education of its space center (CSUG). His research interests are in applied spectroscopy and instrumentation development, as well as quantum optics. He holds an MSc of the Eindhoven Institute of Technology, The Netherlands, and a PhD of Princeton University, USA. His team has specialized in the development of miniaturized ultra-sensitive spectroscopic instrumentation for demanding environments, such as in-situ, real-time water isotope measurements on stratospheric aircraft and the Antarctic glacier.  With the NanoBob project he strives to bring quantum communication to CubeSats.

 

Unconventional computing with optical simulation of spin Hamiltonians

Guest Editors

Mohammad Ali Miri (City University of New York, USA)

Natalia Berloff (University of Cambridge, UK)

Alireza Marandi (California Institute of Technology, USA)

 

Lattice spin models, e.g., XY, Ising and Potts models, are widely utilized in statistical mechanics and in condensed matter physics for exploring magnetism. These models are important tools for exploring phase transitions and critical phenomena. In addition, spin Hamiltonians have been celebrated in the context of computer science as interesting models that can represent a large range of computationally-hard optimization problems. Subsequently, over the years there has been an interest in realizing physical systems that are governed by spin-like Hamiltonians for unconventional computing applications.

In recent years, several works revealed that networks of coupled optical oscillators, e.g., lasers and optical parametric oscillators, show a great promise for emulating a classical spin model. In such systems, the evolution of the oscillator network is toward an equilibrium amplitude and phase pattern that could represent the ground state of the corresponding spin model Hamiltonian. This Collection aims to curate, as a single resource, interesting research articles on the subject of “Unconventional Computing with Optical Simulation of Spin Hamiltonians” from a broad pool of scientists and accelerate the formation of a roadmap for future research directions of the field.

Important dates and information

Focus Collection articles are invite-based. However, if you are interested in submitting an article to the issue, please contact the Guest Editors. Contributions are welcome from October 20, 2020 to October 31, 2021, and accepted papers are published on a rolling basis as soon as they are ready.  

All contributions should report new, original results, and will be subject to the same review process and high standard as regular Communications Physics articlesWe are not seeking review material at this stage but we will consider relevant commentaries and review articles if a case is made for it and in agreement with the guest editors and editorial team.

Submit your paper

Please read the Focus Collection policies page before submitting, and make sure your article is prepared according to our Submission Guidelines and formatted as detailed here.  

To submit your invited manuscript as part of this Collection, once logged into our online submission system, select “Article” under the article type.  Fill in all information as for any regular submission. At step “2. Manuscript Information” in the submission form, under the tab “c) Subjects and Techniques” chose the Collection title from the drop down menu. You can also specify that your manuscript is invited for the "Unconventional computing with optical simulation of spin Hamiltonians" Collection under “Previous interactions” in the "d) Detailed information" tab. Authors should express their interest in the Collection in the cover letter.

As an Open Access journal, Communications Physics offers an optional transparent peer review system, and is supported by Article Processing Charges. Should your work be accepted for publication you will therefore be asked for this fee. Further information about article charges and waivers are available here.

In addition to papers on simulation of spin Hamiltonians, Communications Physics welcomes original research in the field of  optical computing. 

 

About the Guest Editors

Mohammad-Ali Miri is an Assistant Professor of Physics at Queens College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He earned his Ph.D. in Optics from CREOL, the Center for Optics and Photonics, at the University of Central Florida in 2014 and before joining CUNY he worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Electrical Engineering of the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests are in the broad areas of optics and photonics, nonlinear optics and optical computing with a focus on exploring the dynamics of light in complex nonlinear and dissipative systems.

Natalia Berloff is a Professor of Applied Mathematics at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge. Her research interests include quantum fluids, out-of-equilibrium systems, Bose-Einstein condensates, unconventional computing. She developed the concept of polaritonic XY-Ising machines.

Alireza Marandi is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics at Caltech. He received his PhD from Stanford University in 2013. Before joining Caltech he held positions as a postdoctoral scholar and a research engineer at Stanford, a visiting scientist at the National Institute of Informatics in Japan, and a senior engineer in the Advanced Technology Group of Dolby Laboratories. Marandi is a Senior Member of OSA and IEEE and has been the recipient of NSF CAREER award, the AFOSR YIP award, and the Young Scientist Prize of the IUPAP. He is named the 2019 KNI-Wheatley Scholar.

 

Higher-order interaction networks

Guest Editors 

Federico Battiston  (Central European University, Hungary) 

Ginestra Bianconi (Queen Mary University of London, UK)

 

The focus collection page is finally online! Check out our first published papers here!

 

Many real-world systems, from social networks to ecological systems, can be successfully described as graphs, where the elementary units (nodes) are connected by pairwise interactions (links). Despite being widespread, traditional network descriptions often do not provide a faithful representation of reality. Indeed, in many systems interactions among the units are not limited to pairs, but can occur in groups of higher size. These ‘higher-order interactions’ are better described by more complex mathematical structures, such as simplicial complexes and hypergraphs. Keeping track of the higher-order structure of networks has already produced new insights on the functionality of multiple real-world systems, and given rise to new emergent physical phenomena which cannot be understood by breaking higher-order interactions into simple low-order dyads. The aim of this Collection is to provide, as a single resource, a venue for the latest and most important findings on higher-order interaction networks, which we believe will become an important reference for physicists and network scientists working on the topic in the future years.

Important dates and information - deadline extended!

Focus Collection articles are invite-based. However, if you are interested in submitting an article to the issue, please contact the Guest Editors. Contributions are welcome from April 1st to July 1st, 2021, and accepted papers are published on a rolling basis as soon as they are ready.  

All contributions should report new, original results, and will be subject to the same review process and high standard as regular Communications Physics articlesWe are not seeking review material at this stage but we will consider relevant commentaries and review articles if a case is made for it and in agreement with the guest editors and editorial team.

Submit your paper

Please read the Focus Collection policies page before submitting, and make sure your article is prepared according to our Submission Guidelines and formatted as detailed here.  

To submit your invited manuscript as part of this Collection, once logged into our online submission system, select “Article” under the article type.  Fill in all information as for any regular submission. At step “2. Manuscript Information” in the submission form, under the tab “c) Subjects and Techniques” chose the Collection title from the drop down menu. You can also specify that your manuscript is invited for the "Higher-order interaction networks" Collection under “Previous interactions” in the "d) Detailed information" tab. Authors should express their interest in the Collection in the cover letter.

As an Open Access journal, Communications Physics offers an optional transparent peer review system, and is supported by Article Processing Charges. Should your work be accepted for publication you will therefore be asked for this fee. Further information about article charges and waivers are available here.

In addition to papers on higher-order interactions networks, Communications Physics welcomes original research in the field of complex networks. 

 

About the Guest Editors

 

Federico Battiston is Assistant Professor at the Department of Network and Data Science at Central European University, and the Organizer of the Central European Chapter of the Network Science Society. Since January 2020, he serves as Editorial Board Member for Communcations Physics. Before joining DNDS-CEU, he held postdoctoral positions at University College London, and at the Brain & Spine Institute in Paris. Federico holds a PhD in Applied Mathematics from Queen Mary University of London, and degrees in Theoretical Physics from Sapienza University of Rome. He works on the structure and dynamics of complex networks, on network neuroscience, and on computational social science. 

 

Ginestra Bianconi is Professor of Applied Mathematics in the School of Mathematical Sciences of Queen Mary University of London and she is  Alan Turing Fellow at the Alan Turing Institute. Currently she is Chief Editor of JPhys Complexity, Editor of PloSOne, and Scientific Reports, and she is Associate Editor of Chaos, Solitons and Fractals. Her research activity on Statistical Mechanics and Network Science includes Network Theory and its interdisciplinary applications. She has formulated the Bianconi-Barabasi model that displays the Bose-Einstein condensation in complex networks. She  has worked in network entropy and network ensembles and on dynamical processes on networks. In the last years she has been focusing on multilayer networks, simplicial complex  geometry and topology, percolation and network control. She is the author of the book Multilayer Networks: Structure and Function  by Oxford University Press. 

 

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