Author Correction: Major ocular trauma in Taiwan: 2002–2004 versus 2012–2014

Correction to: Scientific Reports https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25030-6, published online 04 May 2018

The PDF and HTML versions of this Article contain extensive typographical errors in the reference citations in the Discussion section.

In the fourth paragraph,

“For the young-adult and middle-aged males in our study, activity risk factors for major ocular trauma were metal-working, driving, social behaviours such as fighting, and participation in dangerous sports or hobbies, similar to findings from previous reports7,8,11–14,17,19. In contrast, women in our study were most often injured at home and the workplace. A universal finding in studies of work-related eye injuries is that 55% to 91% of patients were not using protective eye wear at the time of injury20–23.”

should read:

“For the young-adult and middle-aged males in our study, activity risk factors for major ocular trauma were metal-working, driving, social behaviours such as fighting, and participation in dangerous sports or hobbies, similar to findings from previous reports7,8,11–14,17,20. In contrast, women in our study were most often injured at home and the workplace. A universal finding in studies of work-related eye injuries is that 55% to 91% of patients were not using protective eye wear at the time of injury21–24.”

Additionally,

“Most patients involved in traffic accidents are young adolescents riding motorcycles, a common occurrence in Taiwan24.”

should read:

“Most patients involved in traffic accidents are young adolescents riding motorcycles, a common occurrence in Taiwan25.”

In the fifth paragraph,

“By contrast, middle-age laborers engaging in high-risk work, such as construction, manufacturing, or agriculture, have elongated their working ages and are now retiring later than before25, thereby continuing to be exposed to high risks of ocular trauma over time. Second, a law implemented in 1997 enforcing motorcyclists to wear helmets has reduced the risk and severity of head and/or eye injuries decade by decade, particularly among young males26,27.”

should read:

“By contrast, middle-age laborers engaging in high-risk work, such as construction, manufacturing, or agriculture, have elongated their working ages and are now retiring later than before26, thereby continuing to be exposed to high risks of ocular trauma over time. Second, a law implemented in 1997 enforcing motorcyclists to wear helmets has reduced the risk and severity of head and/or eye injuries decade by decade, particularly among young males27,28.”

Additionally,

“The risk of ocular trauma related to working with hazardous materials or involvement in a traffic accident can be greatly reduced by such measures as using safety (laminated) glass in windscreens; wearing helmets, safety goggles, seat belts, and other protective gear appropriate to the high-risk activity23; and avoiding risky behaviours, such as drinking alcohol before driving or not following safety procedures for operating machinery. Education regarding these safety measures is essential to reduce the incidence and severity of ocular injuries. Evidence from our current study and previous studies indicate that children were usually injured at home or at school28–30; patients aged 60 years or older usually had ocular trauma because of a fall at home31.”

should read:

“The risk of ocular trauma related to working with hazardous materials or involvement in a traffic accident can be greatly reduced by such measures as using safety (laminated) glass in windscreens; wearing helmets, safety goggles, seat belts, and other protective gear appropriate to the high-risk activity24; and avoiding risky behaviours, such as drinking alcohol before driving or not following safety procedures for operating machinery. Education regarding these safety measures is essential to reduce the incidence and severity of ocular injuries. Evidence from our current study and previous studies indicate that children were usually injured at home or at school29–31; patients aged 60 years or older usually had ocular trauma because of a fall at home32.”

In the sixth paragraph,

“By contrast, in studies of “all severities” of ocular trauma presenting to the emergency department, closed-globe injuries were more prevalent, with open-globe injuries reported to represent 6.3% of cases in northern Taiwan and 14.2% in Korea19,32

should read:

“By contrast, in studies of “all severities” of ocular trauma presenting to the emergency department, closed-globe injuries were more prevalent, with open-globe injuries reported to represent 6.3% of cases in northern Taiwan and 14.2% in Korea19,20

In paragraph seven,

“In this study, anterior segment injuries were common and included corneal/scleral laceration or limbal wound dehiscence, hyphaemia, and lens injury, correlating with results reported in our previous study and other published studies11,13,28,30,31,33. On the other hand, posterior segment injuries, such as vitreous haemorrhage, retinal injury, and optic nerve injury, were seen less frequently in our study, but were associated with a worse final visual acuity14,28.”

should read:

“In this study, anterior segment injuries were common and included corneal/scleral laceration or limbal wound dehiscence, hyphaemia, and lens injury, correlating with results reported in our previous study and other published studies11,13,29,31–33. On the other hand, posterior segment injuries, such as vitreous haemorrhage, retinal injury, and optic nerve injury, were seen less frequently in our study, but were associated with a worse final visual acuity14,29.”

In the eighth paragraph,

“Subsequent procedures were performed in 15.4–18.2% of the patients in the two periods of this study, 9.6% of patients in Oum et al.’s study19, and 33% of patients in May et al.’s study20.”

should read:

“Subsequent procedures were performed in 15.4–18.2% of the patients in the two periods of this study, 9.6% of patients in Oum et al.’s study20, and 33% of patients in May et al.’s study21.”

In the ninth paragraph,

“In our previous study and other published studies, the visual outcome after major ocular trauma was generally unsatisfactory4,7,8,11–14,16,28,31. Factors that have been documented to correlate with the visual prognosis after trauma include visual acuity immediately after the injury, presence of an afferent pupillary defect, type and mechanism of injury, location and extent of penetrating wounds, and presence of lens damage, vitreous haemorrhage, retinal detachment, intraocular foreign body, or endophthalmitis14,28,38.”

should read:

“In our previous study and other published studies, the visual outcome after major ocular trauma was generally unsatisfactory4,7,8,11–14,16,29,32. Factors that have been documented to correlate with the visual prognosis after trauma include visual acuity immediately after the injury, presence of an afferent pupillary defect, type and mechanism of injury, location and extent of penetrating wounds, and presence of lens damage, vitreous haemorrhage, retinal detachment, intraocular foreign body, or endophthalmitis14,29,38.”

Finally, in the tenth paragraph,

“The visual outcome profile of our patients was similar to another report of hospitalized ocular trauma patients in Taiwan by Chang et al.11, but far less favourable than those in Tsai et al.’s report32 consisting of “all severities” of ocular trauma treated in the Emergency Department, in which 45.7% of patients had good final visual acuities of 20/40 or better, 24.9% had moderate visual acuities of 20/200 to 20/50, and 11.3% had poor visual acuities of 20/400 or worse.”

should read:

“The visual outcome profile of our patients was similar to another report of hospitalized ocular trauma patients in Taiwan by Chang et al.11, but far less favourable than those in Tsai et al.’s report19 consisting of “all severities” of ocular trauma treated in the Emergency Department, in which 45.7% of patients had good final visual acuities of 20/40 or better, 24.9% had moderate visual acuities of 20/200 to 20/50, and 11.3% had poor visual acuities of 20/400 or worse.”

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Yi-Sheng Chang or Sung-Huei Tseng.

Rights and permissions

Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Chang, Y., Teng, Y., Huang, Y. et al. Author Correction: Major ocular trauma in Taiwan: 2002–2004 versus 2012–2014. Sci Rep 8, 13566 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-31648-3

Download citation

Further reading

Comments

By submitting a comment you agree to abide by our Terms and Community Guidelines. If you find something abusive or that does not comply with our terms or guidelines please flag it as inappropriate.