DISEASE GENOMICS

Public resources aid diabetes gene discovery

An Author Correction to this article was published on 05 November 2018

This article has been updated (view changelog)

The availability of various public resources has hastened the discovery of type 2 diabetes–associated loci in the largest genome-wide association study of the disease reported to date. In addition, these resources have also enabled researchers to get closer to determining the culprit genetic variants and therefore closer to the target effector genes driving these associations.

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Fig. 1: Flowchart outlining how public resources have facilitated the many advances and subsequent discoveries used in this latest GWAS of type 2 diabetes.

Change history

  • 05 November 2018

    In the version of this article originally published, the text was incorrect in the first paragraph of the ‘Remaining challenges’ section. The first two sentences appeared as “Even though this current study substantially increases the number of loci associated with T2D, only approximately 18% of the genetic component of T2D risk is explained by the total complement of genetic variants uncovered genome wide in Mahajan et al.6. Interestingly, only a small proportion of that heritability was explained by low-frequency or rare variants (~1.1%), thus potentially indicating that many more of these variants still remain to be characterized in even larger sample sizes.” However, they should have read “Even though this current study substantially increases the number of loci associated with T2D, only a proportion of the genetic component of T2D risk is explained by the total complement of genetic variants uncovered genome wide in Mahajan et al.6. Interestingly, only a relatively small proportion of that heritability was explained by low-frequency or rare variants, thus potentially indicating that many more of these variants still remain to be characterized in even larger sample sizes.” The text has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the paper.

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Correspondence to Struan F. A. Grant.

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Cousminer, D.L., Grant, S.F.A. Public resources aid diabetes gene discovery. Nat Genet 50, 1499–1500 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41588-018-0242-5

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