Abstract

We have identified a variant in ADCY3 (encoding adenylate cyclase 3) associated with markedly increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes in the Greenlandic population. The variant disrupts a splice acceptor site, and carriers have decreased ADCY3 RNA expression. Additionally, we observe an enrichment of rare ADCY3 loss-of-function variants among individuals with type 2 diabetes in trans-ancestry cohorts. These findings provide new information on disease etiology relevant for future treatment strategies.

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Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge the participants in the Greenlandic health surveys. We thank J. Flannick (Broad Institute) for help with obtaining the AMP-T2D exome sequencing data. The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research is an independent Research Center at the University of Copenhagen partially funded by an unrestricted donation from the Novo Nordisk Foundation (http://www.metabol.ku.dk). This project was also funded by the Danish Council for Independent Research (Sapere Aude DFF-Ung Eliteforsker grant 11-120909 from FSS to I.M.; DFF-4090-00244 from FNU to I.M.; Sapere Aude DFF-Forskningsleder 6108-00038B from FNU to R.A.; DFF-4181-00383 to A.A.), the Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen (http://www.steno.dk), Simon Fougner Hartmanns Familiefond to N.G., the Lundbeck Foundation (R215-2015-4174) to A.A., the Novo Nordisk Foundation (NNF15OC0017918 to N.G.; NNF16OC0019986 to N.G.; NNFCC0018486 to T.H.) and the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement 638173) to R.A. The Greenlandic health surveys (IHIT and B99) were supported by Karen Elise Jensen’s Foundation, the Department of Health in Greenland, NunaFonden, the Medical Research Council of Denmark, the Medical Research Council of Greenland and the Commission for Scientific Research in Greenland.

Author information

Author notes

  1. Niels Grarup and Ida Moltke contributed equally to this work.

Affiliations

  1. Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

    • Niels Grarup
    • , Mette K. Andersen
    • , Timo Kern
    • , Yuvaraj Mahendran
    • , Oluf Pedersen
    •  & Torben Hansen
  2. Bioinformatics Centre, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

    • Ida Moltke
    • , Maria Dalby
    • , Kristoffer Vitting-Seerup
    • , Emil Jørsboe
    • , Robin Andersson
    •  & Anders Albrechtsen
  3. Biotech Research and Innovation Centre (BRIC), University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

    • Kristoffer Vitting-Seerup
  4. National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark

    • Christina V. L. Larsen
    • , Inger K. Dahl-Petersen
    • , Peter Bjerregaard
    •  & Marit E. Jørgensen
  5. Greenland Centre for Health Research, University of Greenland, Nuuk, Greenland

    • Christina V. L. Larsen
    • , Peter Bjerregaard
    •  & Marit E. Jørgensen
  6. Department of Human Genetics, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK

    • Arthur Gilly
    • , Daniel Suveges
    •  & Eleftheria Zeggini
  7. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University of Athens, Athens, Greece

    • George Dedoussis
  8. Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Gentofte, Denmark

    • Marit E. Jørgensen
  9. Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

    • Torben Hansen

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Contributions

T.H. and A.A. conceived and headed the project. I.M. and A.A. designed the statistical setup for the association testing, while T.H., N.G., M.K.A. and O.P. designed the experimental setup for the DNA extraction, genotyping and sequencing. M.E.J. and P.B. were principal investigators of the population studies in Greenland and, together with C.V.L.L. and I.K.D.-P., provided the Greenlandic samples, collected and defined the phenotypes, and provided context for these samples. I.M., N.G., E.J. and A.A. performed the association analyses. T.K. and Y.M. designed the experimental setup for RNA extraction and sequencing. A.G., D.S., G.D. and E.Z. performed the loss-of-function analysis in the Greek cohorts. K.V.-S., M.D. and R.A. performed the RNA sequence analysis. N.G., I.M., M.K.A., A.A. and T.H. wrote the majority of the manuscript with input from all authors. All authors approved the final version of the manuscript.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Marit E. Jørgensen or Anders Albrechtsen or Torben Hansen.

Integrated supplementary information

Supplementary information

  1. Supplementary Text and Figures

    Supplementary Figures 1–3 and Supplementary Tables 2–6.

  2. Life Sciences Reporting Summary.

  3. Supplementary Table 1

    All loss-of-function variants present in at least one copy in the Greenlandic exome sequencing data.