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ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY

Another twist on nitrogenases

An alternative nitrogenase enzyme that only utilizes iron as its cofactor is shown to reduce carbon dioxide while actively fixing dinitrogen, so that it simultaneously produces ammonium, hydrogen and methane.

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

Correspondence to Oliver Einsle.

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Fig. 1: Architecture of nitrogenases and their active-site cofactor.