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M. S. Crossley et al. reply

The Original Article was published on 05 April 2021

The Original Article was published on 05 April 2021

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Fig. 1: Time trends in arthropod abundance among LTERs.
Fig. 2: Time trends in arthropod diversity among LTERs.
Fig. 3: Comparison of abundance trends per taxon between original and updated datasets.

Data availability

All curated data used for analyses in this study are available on GitHub (https://github.com/mcrossley3/insectLTER).

Code availability

R code used to curate and analyse data in this study is available on GitHub (https://github.com/mcrossley3/insectLTER).

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Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Contributions

M.S.C., W.E.S. and M.D.M. conceived of the idea of this study. M.S.C. conducted formal analysis. All authors contributed to the writing of the manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Michael S. Crossley.

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing interests.

Additional information

Peer review information Nature Ecology & Evolution thanks Nick Isaac, Manu Saunders and the other, anonymous, reviewer(s) for their contribution to the peer review of this work.

Publisher’s note Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Extended data

Extended Data Fig. 1 Effort-standardized time trends in arthropod abundance among LTER subsites.

a, Violin plots showing the distribution of abundance trends per taxon averaged among subsites, where abundances were standardized by sampling effort and separated by subsite prior to trend estimation, and trends with < 4 data points were excluded. This analysis differs from that depicted in Fig. 1c,d in that trends associated with experimental treatments in the Cedar Creek sweep nets and North Temperate Lakes crayfish datasets were excluded from analysis. b, Average trend in abundance and 95% confidence intervals from a when trends are averaged among LTERs (d.f. = 12). Mean time trends were not significantly different from zero (p = 0.10). c, Violin plots showing the distribution of abundance trends per taxon averaged among subsites, where abundances were standardized by sampling effort and separated by subsite prior to trend estimation, and trends with < 10 data points were excluded. This analysis differs from that depicted in Fig. 1e,f in that trends associated with experimental treatments in the Cedar Creek sweep nets and North Temperate Lakes crayfish datasets were excluded from analysis. d, Average trend in abundance and 95% confidence intervals from c when trends are averaged among LTERs (d.f. = 11). Mean time trends were not significantly different from zero (p = 0.27).

Extended Data Fig. 2 Effort-standardized time trends in arthropod diversity among LTER subsites.

Time trends in arthropod diversity among LTERs, using the dataset where abundances were standardized by sampling effort and separated by subsite, and time series with < 10 data points were excluded. a, Trends in taxon richness (rarefied). b, Trends in taxon evenness (Pielou’s Index). c, Trends in β diversity (1-Jaccard Similarity Index). Boxplots depict trends among insects as medians (thick line), 25th and 75th percentiles (box edges), 95th percentiles (whiskers), and outliers (circles). Right panels depict average change in diversity metrics and 95% confidence intervals among datasets (d.f.=7). Time trends were not significantly different from zero at α=5%. Please refer to Fig. 1 legend for description of colored text.

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Crossley, M.S., Snyder, W.E. & Moran, M.D. M. S. Crossley et al. reply. Nat Ecol Evol 5, 595–599 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-021-01429-9

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