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INTERSPECIFIC INCOMPATIBILITY

An SI-independent regulator

The stigma has tightly regulated recognition mechanisms at several levels to prevent unwanted pollen from achieving fertilization. Knowledge about barriers controlling interspecific incompatibility is scarce. New evidence reveals a novel gene involved in regulating interspecies incompatibility in self-compatible Arabidopsis thaliana.

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Correspondence to Noni Franklin-Tong.

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Fig. 1: SPRI1 controls interspecific incompatibility.